NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay

Nursing Practice Problem:

The selected nursing problem of focus in my project is falls among hospitalized patients aged 65 years and above. Elderly patients have the highest fall rates as compared to other patient populations. Statistics show that at least 300000 older people suffer from hip fractures annually in the USA. More than 95% of these fractures are attributable to falling sideways. Besides fractures, falls result in premature mortalities, prolonged hospitalizations, poor quality of life, and increased care costs. Health technologies have proven effective in detecting, reducing, and preventing patient falls. For example, the use of automated fall detection systems and sensors have been shown to enhance early detection, prevention, and minimization of falls among hospitalized patients. Therefore, my project examines the use of the technology to improve fall rates among hospitalized elderly patients aged 65 years and above.

Comparison 1: Translational Research vs. Qualitative Research

Criteria Peer-Reviewed Translational Article and Permalink/Working Link:Rahme, M., Folkeard, P., & Scollie, S. (2021). Evaluating the accuracy of step tracking and fall detection in the Starkey Livio artificial intelligence hearing aids: A pilot study. American Journal of Audiology, 30(1), 182–189. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJA-20-00105

Translational Research Type: T2

Peer-Reviewed Traditional Article and Permalink/Working Link:Coahran, M., Hillier, L. M., Bussel, L. V., Black, E., Churchyard, R., Gutmanis, I., Ioannou, Y., Michael, K., Ross, T., & Mihailidis, A. (2018). Automated fall detection technology in inpatient geriatric psychiatry: Nurses’ perceptions and lessons learned. Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(3), 245. 10.1017/S0714980818000181

Traditional Qualitative Research Type: Qualitative study

Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology This study was pilot research to examine the effectiveness of an automated fall detection system in fall detection and detecting fall maneuvers. The adopted technology was Starkey Livio Artificial Intelligence hearing aids and tracking step count. The participants wore the system, a Sportline pedometer, and Fitbit Charge 3 concurrently during treadmill and real-world walking conditions. Fall detection and alert were assessed by falling maneuvers of the activities of daily living. This study was a qualitative study that examined the perceptions of nurses with the HELPER system and lessoned learned from its ability to prevent and reduce patient falls. The study was conducted following a pilot test where nurses were interviewed about their perceptions of the HELPER technology. The nurses were from two geriatric units in Ontario, Canada. Data was analyzed using qualitative naturalistic inquiry approach. The studies differ on their designs. The study by Rahme et al. (2021) adopted quantitative methods while that by Coahran et al. (2018) adopted qualitative methods. They also differ based on the technologies that were examined for effectiveness in fall prevention and detection. Coahran et al. (2018) utilized qualitative methods of data collection and analysis while Rahme et al. (2021) used quantitative approaches to data collection and analysis. They both focused on the effectiveness of automated technologies in fall detection and prevention.
Goals The primary aim of this research was to examine the effectiveness and efficacy of Starkey Livio Artificial Intelligence hearing aids in tracking step count. The secondary aim was to investigate the accuracy of the fall detection and alert system of Livio hearing aids in detecting fall maneuvers. The goal of this study was to obtain the perceptions of nurses with their use of the HELPER system. The study also aimed to identify lessons learned from the technology use in preventing falls in two geriatric units caring patients aged between 60 and 90 years. The two studies are similar in that they examined the effectiveness of health technologies in fall detection, notification, and prevention. They differ based on the technologies that were being investigated for their effectiveness.
Data Collection Data on patient’s real-world health condition was obtained through a 5-day period. Step count was done for six different treadmill speeds. The generated fall detection and alerts were analyzed to determine their effectiveness in reducing fall risks among the patients. Data for this research was collected through interviews conducted with nurses working in the unit. The interviews were conducted over two days by a trained research associate who did not participate in the pilot implementation. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed. The data collection approaches in the studies differ. Coahran et al. (2018) utilized interviews that were digitally recorded and transcribed. Rahme et al. (2021) utilized quantitative methods of data collection based on the observed and physiological changes with activity.

Comparison 2: Translational Research vs. Quantitative Research

            Criteria Peer-Reviewed Translational Article and Permalink/Working Link:Lumetzberger, J., Münzer, T., & Kampel, M. (2021). Non-obtrusive 3d body tracking for automated mobility assessment in independently living older persons: Results of a pilot trial. EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology, 7(26), e4–e4. https://doi.org/10.4108/eai.4-3-2021.168863

Translational Research Type: T2

Peer-Reviewed Traditional Article and Permalink/Working Link:Nemeth, B., van der Kaaij, M., Nelissen, R., van Wijnen, J.-K., Drost, K., & Blauw, G. J. (2022). Prevention of hip fractures in older adults residing in long-term care facilities with a hip airbag: A retrospective pilot study. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), 547. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-022-03221-1

Traditional Quantitative Research Type: Retrospective quantitative study

Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology The study was a pilot investigation of the effectiveness of real time data and mobility assessments in fall detection and prevention. The intervention entailed automatic tracking and detection of movements for the study participants using Orbbec Astra 3d camera. A field trial for the intervention was done for a 10-month period in the private homes of 20 generally healthy older adults. 20 study participants were enrolled and assessed following their use of automated trackers for parameters such as movement patterns, size, and height. Data was expressed as standard deviation and means. Linear regression analysis was done to determine the association of manual physical therapy with machine-based gait data. This study was a retrospective pilot study that involved 969 participants residing in 11 long-term facilities for the older patients. The researchers utilized intervention that entails the application of 45 WOLK-hip airbags for fall and fracture detection and prevention. The inclusion criteria included physically active participants with pelvic circumference of 90-125 cm. The exclusion criteria included participants who continuously removed hip airbag for themselves and those depending on wheelchair for mobility. The two studies focused on the effect of technology use in improving gait, physical activity, and falls among the elderly. They differed based on the study designs. While the study by Nemeth et al., (2022) was a retrospective quantitative research, the one by Lumetzberger et al., (2021) was a pilot study on the use of 3D technology in patient monitoring and assessment of fall risk. The two studies support that health technologies are feasible for use in fall detection and prevention.
Goals The goal of this study was to assess mobility of the older persons using real time data and comparing it with the mobility assessment of physiotherapists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of introducing WOLK hip airbag on the incidence of hip fractures. The secondary aim was to evaluate the occurrences of falls and pelvic fractures among the participants. The two studies differ based on their goals. The study by Lumetzberger et al., (2021) examined the effectiveness of using real-time data on gait studies and fall rates while Nemeth et al., (2022) investigated the effect of airbags on fall rates and fractures among those at risk.
Data Collection A trained physical therapist conducted gait study tests to each of the study subjects. They collected data on the participants’ ability to perform three repetitive tasks to assess for possible mobility changes. At the same time, an automated tracker measured test duration and gait velocity for use in comparing both data. Data on hip, falls, and pelvic fractures were collected from electronic incidence reports for the participants. The demographic data were extracted electronically from patient records and summarized for median of the study period. The studies differ on the approaches to data collection. The study by Nemeth et al., (2022) utilized electronic data of the participants to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. On the other hand, Lumetzberger et al., (2021) focused mainly on the physiological changes that occurred with the delivery of the intervention to the participants. Both approaches to data collection were quantitative.

Conclusion

In summary, the reviewed studies show that automated technologies and systems are effective in fall detection, notification, and prevention. They also reduce the risk and rate of injuries due to falls, including fractures. Evidence obtained from translational and traditional sources of evidence support technology use in fall prevention. Therefore, it should be considered for use in healthcare and nursing practice.

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay References

Coahran, M., Hillier, L. M., Bussel, L. V., Black, E., Churchyard, R., Gutmanis, I., Ioannou, Y., Michael, K., Ross, T., & Mihailidis, A. (2018). Automated fall detection technology in inpatient geriatric psychiatry: Nurses’ perceptions and lessons learned. Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(3), 245. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0714980818000181

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Lumetzberger, J., Münzer, T., & Kampel, M. (2021). Non-obtrusive 3d body tracking for automated mobility assessment in independently living older persons: Results of a pilot trial. EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology, 7(26), e4–e4. https://doi.org/10.4108/eai.4-3-2021.168863

Nemeth, B., van der Kaaij, M., Nelissen, R., van Wijnen, J.-K., Drost, K., & Blauw, G. J. (2022). Prevention of hip fractures in older adults residing in long-term care facilities with a hip airbag: A retrospective pilot study. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), 547. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-022-03221-1

Rahme, M., Folkeard, P., & Scollie, S. (2021). Evaluating the accuracy of step tracking and fall detection in the Starkey Livio artificial intelligence hearing aids: A pilot study. American Journal of Audiology, 30(1), 182–189. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJA-20-00105

Translational Research Graphic Organizer Template

 

  < Nephrology Research> < The distinction between structured (practical) and unstructured (theoretical) research in clinical trials > Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology  The T1, T2 and T3 translational studies compel the researcher to directly participate in the study variables with the sole intention of achieving the research objectives. The research full controls both the independent and dependent variables throughout the life of the study. For each of the three studies, the following methodologies are seen:

T1: Case studies, Phases I & II Clinical Trials, and observational studies.

T2: Phase IV Clinical trials, Diffusion research, Dissemination research and Implementation Research.

T3: Evidence synthesis, Guidelines, Observations, and Phase III Clinical Trials

 

 

 

 

Traditional practices also have their own methodologies. They are different as thus:Qualitative: Boyack et al. (2014) reveals that qualitative studies have adopt observations, focus groups, observation, and individual depth interviews to obtain data.

Quantitative: These studies utilize methods such as surveys, simulations and audits to get data.

Translational research and traditional research are complex endeavors that lead to the adoption of hypothesis in order to formulate clinical decisions.Further, the researchers in both studies are required to establish a design and then take part in the research process.

However, translational research undertakings are monitored closely so as to answer certain biomedical issues.

Goals  T1: Formulating treatments as well as interventions (Harrington & Hauskeller, 2014).

T2: Implementation and Dissemination of research outcomes to effect system-wide change (Ullah, 2017).

T3: Testing efficaciousness and effectiveness of the formulated interventions and treatments (Ortiz, 2015).

 

 

 

 

The qualitative studies are used to formulate a comprehension of the underlying causes as well as motivations (Boyack et al., 2014). They further reveal prevalent trends in opinions and thoughts. On the other hand, quantitative studies seek to identity data and then make a generalization of the results predicated upon a certain sample to the population that a researcher is interested in studying. Translational research addresses a certain health care policy with a view of integrating evidence-based solutions into practice. Nevertheless, traditional research seeks to examine human behavior as well as discover facts concerning a certain phenomenon in the social sphere.
Data Collection The data for the studies were obtained from clinical trials, practice-based research networks as well as population –based interventions. 

 

 

 

 

The collection of data for qualitative studies occur through participant observation. However, when it comes to quantitative research, the same process is achieved through measuring of variables. Whereas translational research entails the implementation of research study outcomes in practice, traditional studies principally entail analyzing obtained data using multifarious statistical tools.

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NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay References

Boyack, K. W., Patek, M., Ungar, L. H., Yoon, P., & Klavans, R. (2014). Classification of individual articles from all of science by research level. Journal of Informetrics8(1), 1-12.

Harrington, J., & Hauskeller, C. (2014). Translational research: an imperative shaping the spaces in biomedicine. TECNOSCIENZA: Italian Journal of Science & Technology Studies5(1), 191-202.

Ortiz, A. (2015). Translational nephrology: what translational research is and a bird’s-eye view on translational research in nephrology. Clinical kidney journal8(1), 14-22.

Ullah, M. H. (2017). TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH. Advances in Basic Medical Sciences (PMDC Recognized)1(1).

Re: Topic 1 DQ 1

Translational research is form of clinical research that was first seen around 1993 (Rubio et al, 2010). So as far as research goes this is a fairly new was to look into things. There is also no clear definition of translational research, but essentially it encompasses two areas of translation one being the information obtained in pre-clinical studies, lab research and the other being the adaptation of best practices in the community with their cost effectiveness (Rubio et al, 2010). There are three levels of translational research, starting with T1, which involves the beginning research or development of an intervention, including the lab research, observational research and phase I and II clinical trials (Translational Research, n.d.). The second level is T2 the translation to patients, testing these interventions and their efficacy on the patient populace, including phase III clinical trials, studying how these new interventions work with disease processes and creating new guidelines with up-to-date information (Translational Research, n.d.). The third level is T3 disseminating and implementation of all the research into daily practice, creating the research evidence found into evidence-based practices across the profession (Translational Research, n.d.).

From this information there isn’t a difference between evidence-based practice and translational research, it is just a way to get to evidence based practice. By following the ‘three T’s’, the final step is to put all of this research into practice, as evidence-based practice. For public health this means the most up to date care and information as the natural progression of translational practice ends with practice. If there is no research being done in the area however, this has a negative impact on the population, as there is not up to date EPB related to that disease process and/or its co morbidities.

Rubio, D. M., Schoenbaum, E. E., Lee, L. S., Schteingart, D. E., Marantz, P. R., Anderson, K. E., Platt, L. D., Baez, A., & Esposito, K. (2010). Defining translational research: implications for training. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges85(3), 470–475. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181ccd618

Translational Research – Defining the “T’s” | Translational Cancer Research Network. (n.d.). Www.Tcrn.Unsw.Edu. Retrieved June 18, 2021, from http://www.tcrn.unsw.edu.au/translational-research-definitions

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay

RESPOND HERE (150 W0ORDS, 2 REFERENCES)

This is insightful Sarah, translational research is form of clinical research that was first seen around 1993. So as far as research goes this is a fairly new was to look into things. Translational research refers to a form of study that seeks to produce more applicable, meaningful and valid outcomes that can directly impact human health. The main objective or purpose of the translational research is to translate essential science discoveries more quickly and efficiently into practices (Eske, 2020). Translational research has been applied frequently by different researchers to enhance research processes geared towards achieving quality treatment processes and effective patient outcomes. There are three major level of translational research including T1, T2, and T3. These levels need to be incorporated into the research processes to ensure accuracy and effective outcomes in the research processes (Woolf, 2018). Level I or T1 often involves development of interventions to ensure that the entire research processes is done effectively in line with the set objectives.

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay References

Woolf, S. H. (2018). The meaning of translational research and why it matters. Jama299(2), 211-213. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/1149350

The selected nursing problem of focus in my project is falls among hospitalized patients aged 65 years and above. Elderly patients have the highest fall rates as compared to other patient populations. Statistics show that at least 300000 older people suffer from hip fractures annually in the USA. More than 95% of these fractures are attributable to falling sideways. Besides fractures, falls result in premature mortalities, prolonged hospitalizations, poor quality of life, and increased care costs. Health technologies have proven effective in detecting, reducing, and preventing patient falls. For example, the use of automated fall detection systems and sensors have been shown to enhance early detection, prevention, and minimization of falls among hospitalized patients. Therefore, my project examines the use of the technology to improve fall rates among hospitalized elderly patients aged 65 years and above.

Any educational or service-based organization that performs research as a component of its purpose and duty must have an institutional review board (IRB). According to Amdur and Bankert (2011), like an ethics committee that focuses on what is desirable or undesirable, it is a committee whose primary responsibility is to protect the rights and welfare of research subjects. Most respectable academic publications want proof that an IRB review was completed before a study is started at the time of submission. To preserve the paper’s anonymity, an approval number from the IRB is not necessary at the time of request; nevertheless, if the work is accepted, it is appropriate to include this information in the publication. Whether financed or not, biological and social science research must undergo an IRB review and approval process. It is crucial to follow the ethical guidelines that guide research laws when performing clinical studies on human subjects. Even though many oversight bodies might be involved, the researcher and study teams are ultimately responsible for protecting the participants’ rights and welfare. Thus, researchers must recognize human subject protection’s background, guidelines, and objectives (McNair L (2022).

An uncomfortable past of unethical behavior with human subjects led to the creation of the IRB system as a federal requirement. Among these is the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, which was carried out between 1932 and 1972 to investigate the consequences of untreated syphilis in humans. This study, which was funded by the US government and involved impoverished males of color, provides a horrifying picture of the detrimental effects of uncontrolled research. Since then, it has impacted research ethics regulations (Pearson, 2020, p.523).

This Tuskegee Syphilis Study led to the Belmont Report, establishing three critical ethical research and practice principles. The report covered applying these principles to research procedures, outlining the details, understanding, and readiness to volunteer. The three essential components of valid informed consent are the systematic evaluation of study risks and benefits and best practices for subject selection. The problems and difficulties that contemporary clinical research faces were not anticipated. Still, the Belmont Report has withstood the test of time and continues to serve as the main guideline for moral clinical research conduct in the United States.

An excellent example of how respect for human subjects, potential benefits and burdens of research, and justice were balanced when time was of the essence, requiring rapid review of research articles with limited data and an urgency to improve outcomes for patients with COVID-19 is discussed by Ford et al. (2021) in the article below.

Ford, D. E., Johnson, A., Nichols, J. J., Rothwell, E., Dubinett, S., & Naeim, A. (2021). Challenges and lessons learned for institutional review board procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of clinical and translational science5(1), e107. https://doi.org/10.1017/cts.2021.27

References

McNair L. (2022). Ethical and regulatory oversight of clinical research: The role of the Institutional Review Board. Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.)247(7), 561–566. https://doi.org/10.1177/15353702221078216

Pearson, G. S. (2020). Institutional Review Board. Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association26(6), 523-524. https://doi.org/10.1177/1078390320965244

Comparison 1: Translational Research vs. Qualitative Research

Criteria Peer-Reviewed Translational Article and Permalink/Working Link:Rahme, M., Folkeard, P., & Scollie, S. (2021). Evaluating the accuracy of step tracking and fall detection in the Starkey Livio artificial intelligence hearing aids: A pilot study. American Journal of Audiology, 30(1), 182–189. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJA-20-00105

Translational Research Type: T2

Peer-Reviewed Traditional Article and Permalink/Working Link:Coahran, M., Hillier, L. M., Bussel, L. V., Black, E., Churchyard, R., Gutmanis, I., Ioannou, Y., Michael, K., Ross, T., & Mihailidis, A. (2018). Automated fall detection technology in inpatient geriatric psychiatry: Nurses’ perceptions and lessons learned. Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(3), 245. 10.1017/S0714980818000181

Traditional Qualitative Research Type: Qualitative study

Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology This study was pilot research to examine the effectiveness of an automated fall detection system in fall detection and detecting fall maneuvers. The adopted technology was Starkey Livio Artificial Intelligence hearing aids and tracking step count. The participants wore the system, a Sportline pedometer, and Fitbit Charge 3 concurrently during treadmill and real-world walking conditions. Fall detection and alert were assessed by falling maneuvers of the activities of daily living. This study was a qualitative study that examined the perceptions of nurses with the HELPER system and lessoned learned from its ability to prevent and reduce patient falls. The study was conducted following a pilot test where nurses were interviewed about their perceptions of the HELPER technology. The nurses were from two geriatric units in Ontario, Canada. Data was analyzed using qualitative naturalistic inquiry approach. The studies differ on their designs. The study by Rahme et al. (2021) adopted quantitative methods while that by Coahran et al. (2018) adopted qualitative methods. They also differ based on the technologies that were examined for effectiveness in fall prevention and detection. Coahran et al. (2018) utilized qualitative methods of data collection and analysis while Rahme et al. (2021) used quantitative approaches to data collection and analysis. They both focused on the effectiveness of automated technologies in fall detection and prevention.
Goals The primary aim of this research was to examine the effectiveness and efficacy of Starkey Livio Artificial Intelligence hearing aids in tracking step count. The secondary aim was to investigate the accuracy of the fall detection and alert system of Livio hearing aids in detecting fall maneuvers. The goal of this study was to obtain the perceptions of nurses with their use of the HELPER system. The study also aimed to identify lessons learned from the technology use in preventing falls in two geriatric units caring patients aged between 60 and 90 years. The two studies are similar in that they examined the effectiveness of health technologies in fall detection, notification, and prevention. They differ based on the technologies that were being investigated for their effectiveness.
Data Collection Data on patient’s real-world health condition was obtained through a 5-day period. Step count was done for six different treadmill speeds. The generated fall detection and alerts were analyzed to determine their effectiveness in reducing fall risks among the patients. Data for this research was collected through interviews conducted with nurses working in the unit. The interviews were conducted over two days by a trained research associate who did not participate in the pilot implementation. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed. The data collection approaches in the studies differ. Coahran et al. (2018) utilized interviews that were digitally recorded and transcribed. Rahme et al. (2021) utilized quantitative methods of data collection based on the observed and physiological changes with activity.

Comparison 2: Translational Research vs. Quantitative Research

            Criteria Peer-Reviewed Translational Article and Permalink/Working Link:Lumetzberger, J., Münzer, T., & Kampel, M. (2021). Non-obtrusive 3d body tracking for automated mobility assessment in independently living older persons: Results of a pilot trial. EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology, 7(26), e4–e4. https://doi.org/10.4108/eai.4-3-2021.168863

Translational Research Type: T2

Peer-Reviewed Traditional Article and Permalink/Working Link:Nemeth, B., van der Kaaij, M., Nelissen, R., van Wijnen, J.-K., Drost, K., & Blauw, G. J. (2022). Prevention of hip fractures in older adults residing in long-term care facilities with a hip airbag: A retrospective pilot study. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), 547. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-022-03221-1

Traditional Quantitative Research Type: Retrospective quantitative study

Observations (Similarities/Differences)
Methodology The study was a pilot investigation of the effectiveness of real time data and mobility assessments in fall detection and prevention. The intervention entailed automatic tracking and detection of movements for the study participants using Orbbec Astra 3d camera. A field trial for the intervention was done for a 10-month period in the private homes of 20 generally healthy older adults. 20 study participants were enrolled and assessed following their use of automated trackers for parameters such as movement patterns, size, and height. Data was expressed as standard deviation and means. Linear regression analysis was done to determine the association of manual physical therapy with machine-based gait data. This study was a retrospective pilot study that involved 969 participants residing in 11 long-term facilities for the older patients. The researchers utilized intervention that entails the application of 45 WOLK-hip airbags for fall and fracture detection and prevention. The inclusion criteria included physically active participants with pelvic circumference of 90-125 cm. The exclusion criteria included participants who continuously removed hip airbag for themselves and those depending on wheelchair for mobility. The two studies focused on the effect of technology use in improving gait, physical activity, and falls among the elderly. They differed based on the study designs. While the study by Nemeth et al., (2022) was a retrospective quantitative research, the one by Lumetzberger et al., (2021) was a pilot study on the use of 3D technology in patient monitoring and assessment of fall risk. The two studies support that health technologies are feasible for use in fall detection and prevention.
Goals The goal of this study was to assess mobility of the older persons using real time data and comparing it with the mobility assessment of physiotherapists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of introducing WOLK hip airbag on the incidence of hip fractures. The secondary aim was to evaluate the occurrences of falls and pelvic fractures among the participants. The two studies differ based on their goals. The study by Lumetzberger et al., (2021) examined the effectiveness of using real-time data on gait studies and fall rates while Nemeth et al., (2022) investigated the effect of airbags on fall rates and fractures among those at risk.
Data Collection A trained physical therapist conducted gait study tests to each of the study subjects. They collected data on the participants’ ability to perform three repetitive tasks to assess for possible mobility changes. At the same time, an automated tracker measured test duration and gait velocity for use in comparing both data. Data on hip, falls, and pelvic fractures were collected from electronic incidence reports for the participants. The demographic data were extracted electronically from patient records and summarized for median of the study period. The studies differ on the approaches to data collection. The study by Nemeth et al., (2022) utilized electronic data of the participants to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. On the other hand, Lumetzberger et al., (2021) focused mainly on the physiological changes that occurred with the delivery of the intervention to the participants. Both approaches to data collection were quantitative.

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay Conclusion

In summary, the reviewed studies show that automated technologies and systems are effective in fall detection, notification, and prevention. They also reduce the risk and rate of injuries due to falls, including fractures. Evidence obtained from translational and traditional sources of evidence support technology use in fall prevention. Therefore, it should be considered for use in healthcare and nursing practice.

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Proposal Research Design Comparison Essay References

Coahran, M., Hillier, L. M., Bussel, L. V., Black, E., Churchyard, R., Gutmanis, I., Ioannou, Y., Michael, K., Ross, T., & Mihailidis, A. (2018). Automated fall detection technology in inpatient geriatric psychiatry: Nurses’ perceptions and lessons learned. Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue Canadienne Du Vieillissement, 37(3), 245. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0714980818000181

Lumetzberger, J., Münzer, T., & Kampel, M. (2021). Non-obtrusive 3d body tracking for automated mobility assessment in independently living older persons: Results of a pilot trial. EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology, 7(26), e4–e4. https://doi.org/10.4108/eai.4-3-2021.168863

Nemeth, B., van der Kaaij, M., Nelissen, R., van Wijnen, J.-K., Drost, K., & Blauw, G. J. (2022). Prevention of hip fractures in older adults residing in long-term care facilities with a hip airbag: A retrospective pilot study. BMC Geriatrics, 22(1), 547. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-022-03221-1

Rahme, M., Folkeard, P., & Scollie, S. (2021). Evaluating the accuracy of step tracking and fall detection in the Starkey Livio artificial intelligence hearing aids: A pilot study. American Journal of Audiology, 30(1), 182–189. https://doi.org/10.1044/2020_AJA-20-00105

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