INTERACTION BETWEEN NURSE INFORMATICISTS AND OTHER SPECIALISTS NURS 6050

INTERACTION BETWEEN NURSE INFORMATICISTS AND OTHER SPECIALISTS NURS 6050

INTERACTION BETWEEN NURSE INFORMATICISTS AND OTHER SPECIALISTS NURS 6050

INTERACTION BETWEEN NURSE INFORMATICISTS AND OTHER SPECIALISTS NURS 6050

Although most nursing informatics work is done behind the scenes, it has a profound effect on many facets of our industry and daily lives. Healthcare data and information is collected and analyzed by nursing informaticists (NI) to monitor the effects of healthcare treatments. According to research (Threw, 2016). At work, I make regular use of NI for incident report tracking. The system keeps tabs on incidents like these, as well as those involving patient-to-staff and patient-to-patient violence. They monitor the frequency with which these events occur in order to determine which preventative measures are effective and which are not. 

Incorrect medicine delivery is only one example of the kinds of medical mistakes that may be reduced because to NI’s efforts to enhance the healthcare system. It was NI who spearheaded the effort to improve our hospital’s medicine delivery procedures from the ground up (McGonigle & Mastrian et al., 2017). A patient’s wristband, patient record, and medicine label must all match before we may give them a dose of medication. 

Our relationships with NI might be enhanced if we had a more direct channel for reporting problems with the EHR (EHR). While Point Click Care is a fantastic EHR, it does have a lot of nitpicky flaws that we’ve had to work around. Both myself and many of my coworkers find this very irritating. If we could more easily get in touch with the people in charge of our EHR, we could share our discoveries (and our disappointments) and work together to develop solutions. 

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In my opinion, the significance of NI expertise will increase in the next years. The field of NI has a lot of space to expand thanks to the development of artificial intelligence (AI) and remote monitoring tools like fall detection gadgets and remote blood sugar monitors. This emphasizes the significance of having clear lines of communication between the frontline healthcare staff and the team responsible for the EHR’s development and the NI division.

References

Kassam, I., Nagle, L., & Strudwick, G. (2017). Informatics competencies for nurse leaders: 

protocol for a scoping review. BMJ open, 7(12), e018855. 

https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018855Links to an external site.

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2022). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (5th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning

Threw, J. (2016, April 19). Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. Health Leaders.Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

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Nature offers many examples of specialization and collaboration. Ant colonies and bee hives are but two examples of nature’s sophisticated organizations. Each thrives because their members specialize by tasks, divide labor, and collaborate to ensure food, safety, and general well-being of the colony or hive.

Of course, humans don’t fare too badly in this regard either. And healthcare is a great example. As specialists in the collection, access, and application of data, nurse informaticists collaborate with specialists on a regular basis to ensure that appropriate data is available to make decisions and take actions to ensure the general well-being of patients.

In this Discussion, you will reflect on your own observations of and/or experiences with informaticist collaboration. You will also propose strategies for how these collaborative experiences might be improved.

RESOURCES

Be sure to review the Learning Resources before completing this activity.
Click the weekly resources link to access the resources. 

WEEKLY RESOURCES

To Prepare:

  • Review the Resources and reflect on the evolution of nursing informatics from a science to a nursing specialty.
  • Consider your experiences with nurse Informaticists or technology specialists within your healthcare organization.

BY DAY 3 OF WEEK 3

Post a description of experiences or observations about how nurse informaticists and/or data or technology specialists interact with other professionals within your healthcare organization. Suggest at least one strategy on how these interactions might be improved. Be specific and provide examples. Then, explain the impact you believe the continued evolution of nursing informatics as a specialty and/or the continued emergence of new technologies might have on professional interactions.

Nurse informaticists interact with other professionals in the healthcare setting. 

Nursing informatics has evolved beyond data management, and the American Nurses Association (ANA) has expanded the definition to include that NI is a “specialty that integrates nursing science with information and analytical sciences to identify, define, manage, and communicate data, information, knowledge, and wisdom in nursing practice” (Sipes, 2016). Nurse informaticists are especially important in the healthcare industry.

They provide critical information and support for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Nurse informaticists ensure that the information gathered is accurate and current, which helps guide nurses on how to do their job effectively and take care of patients. Communication between nurse informaticists and other specialists makes a healthcare system function successfully. Working together will ensure that patients receive the best care and will also identify ways to improve care.  

Experiences & Observations 

Recently my daughter was hospitalized, and I was amazed at how much the technology has changed in the last six years that I have been away from inpatient nursing. During her stay, she was given intravenous fluids (IV) and multiple IV boluses of Glucose. I observed that on the IV pump, there were several barcodes. These barcodes were scanned each time a nurse hung a fluid bag or changed the infusion rate. First, the nurse would log onto the computer and the Electronic Health Record (EHR). They then scanned my daughter’s armband with her identification, the IV fluids being hung, and the IV pump. When the IV pump was scanned, it would project the physician’s order for the IV fluids on the computer screen and show the nurse the correct rate and amount of fluid that should be infused.

It was a double check for the nurse to ensure that the correct fluid and amount of fluid were given to the right patient. As a nurse and a former PICU nurse, I know firsthand how important it is to ensure that the correct fluid, rate, and amount of fluid is given to the right patient. I have experienced many morning huddles discussing mistakes and close calls regarding IV fluid infusions. Due to these mistakes or close calls, hanging IV fluids changed and was made safer for the patients receiving the fluids. There is now a double check done by the EHR and the IV pump or Smart Pump infusing the IV fluids. “IV infusion is associated with 54% of all adverse drug events, 56% of medication errors, and 61% of serious life-threatening errors” (Giuliano, 2015).

Infusion pump therapy was introduced 45 years ago to monitor the rate and volume of IV medications (Alamer, 2023). “In 2018, about 89.5% of hospitals in the United States use Smart Pump Technology” (Alamer, 2023). The smart pump contains dose error reduction software that prevents changes in the infusion programming and warns users if they attempt to deviate from the drug library set standards. Smart Pump Technology has helped safely administer and avoid errors of infusion. However, there is still room for improvement. An even safer way to deliver IV fluids would be for the pump to auto-program after the fluid and pump are scanned by the nurse and auto-document the rate and amount of fluid to be infused. This way, the nurse only selects the start button to begin the infusion.  

Impact of the evolution of nursing informatics and continued emergence of recent technologies 

The advancement of technology will continue to affect nursing and nursing informatics. Nurses face challenges as increased technology is brought to the workplace. Technology has been seen as a distraction or unwelcome intrusion into nurses’ hands-on caring role and therapeutic relationships with patients and families (Booth et al., 2021). Ensuring nurses are fully present in their interactions with patients is essential with technological advancements. “Nursing will continue to offer value and importance to healthcare systems. However, the profession must consider its role, knowledge, and relationships with technologies and patients to remain relevant in digitally enabled societies and healthcare systems and continue to provide compassionate care in a digital world” (Booth et al., 2021).  

References 

Alamer F, Alanazi A T (March 10, 2023) The Impact of Smart Pump Technology in the Healthcare System: A Scope Review. Cureus 15(3): e36007. doi:10.7759/cureus.36007 

Booth, R. G., Strudwick, G., McBride, S., O’Connor, S., & Solano López, A. L. (2021). How the nursing profession should adapt for a digital future. The BMJ373, n1190. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1190 

Giuliano K. K. (2015). IV Smart Pumps: The Impact of a Simplified User Interface on Clinical Use. Biomedical instrumentation & technologySuppl, 13–21. https://doi.org/10.2345/0899-8205-49.s4.13 

Sipes, C. (2016). Project Management: Essential Skill of Nurse Informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics225, 252–256. 

Your post got me to reflect on the many interactions I’ve had at my facility with others that may have been interaction with a technology specialist and I just didn’t realize it at the time. I too took an Epic training class when I first started, and a nurse who had many years of experience as an emergency and intensive care nurse taught the class on how to use epic. I’m not sure how nurses were able to provide care for their patients and provide accurate documentation before electronic healthcare records(EMR). EMR’s such as Epic has helped to lower government healthcare spending while providing quality care and improving patient outcome (Beauvais et al., 2021).

Looking, back he may have had some form of experience in information technology as well. I also have been able to reflect on all the warning alerts that we receive on EPIC while caring for our patients. For example, if a patient’t Lactate comes backs abnormal, every time you log into the patient’s chart in Epic, an alert will pop up alerting you that the patient’s lactate was elevated and a new sample will need to be collected. This is something that could be easily missed with our busy task filled day, but thanks to that communication in Epic, the providers and nursing staff can be reminded on efficiently caring for the patient. I have never had a nurse informaticist or information specialist conduct an in service on my unit, but from reading other posts, this is something that is commonly done, and I believe it is beneficial to both the nursing staff and the informaticist. Nurse informaticist are part of the delivery of care because they help nursing staff collect data, develop skills and build knowledge (Grenuk, 2019).

BY DAY 6 OF WEEK 3

Respond to at least two of your colleagues* on two different days, offering one or more additional interaction strategies in support of the examples/observations shared or by offering further insight to the thoughts shared about the future of these interactions.

*Note: Throughout this program, your fellow students are referred to as colleagues.

INTERACTION BETWEEN NURSE INFORMATICISTS AND OTHER SPECIALISTS

Nature offers many examples of specialization and collaboration. Ant colonies and bee hives are but two examples of nature’s sophisticated organizations. Each thrives because their members specialize by tasks, divide labor, and collaborate to ensure food, safety, and general well-being of the colony or hive.

Of course, humans don’t fare too badly in this regard either. And healthcare is a great example. As specialists in the collection, access, and application of data, nurse informaticists collaborate with specialists on a regular basis to ensure that appropriate data is available to make decisions and take actions to ensure the general well-being of patients.

In this Discussion, you will reflect on your own observations of and/or experiences with informaticist collaboration. You will also propose strategies for how these collaborative experiences might be improved.

RESOURCES

Be sure to review the Learning Resources before completing this activity.
Click the weekly resources link to access the resources. 

WEEKLY RESOURCES

To Prepare:

  • Review the Resources and reflect on the evolution of nursing informatics from a science to a nursing specialty.
  • Consider your experiences with nurse Informaticists or technology specialists within your healthcare organization.

BY DAY 3 OF WEEK 3

Post a description of experiences or observations about how nurse informaticists and/or data or technology specialists interact with other professionals within your healthcare organization. Suggest at least one strategy on how these interactions might be improved. Be specific and provide examples. Then, explain the impact you believe the continued evolution of nursing informatics as a specialty and/or the continued emergence of new technologies might have on professional interactions.

I have found your post very interesting. According to the TIGER team, TIGER was established in 2007 to help reform technology informatics education (2007). This organization has a 10-year action plan to help implement the education of practicing nurses and nursing students to fully engage in the digital technologies of healthcare (2007). I personally have not seen educational opportunities in my organization that has been assigned to all clinical staff as mandatory learning when it comes to basic computer knowledge. They train on their software, but many older nurses that I have encountered still have trouble with basic computer knowledge and should be trained in those basic skills.

Our online e-learning site can teach some basic skills, but the nurses must assign them to themselves.  The only mandatory computer skill that is conducted every year is cyber security and what to report.  With the advancements in technology expanding at a rapid pace, nurses need to have a strong foundation in computer basics (2022). Essentially strong nursing leadership will need to help lead nurses to navigate new and complex technology such as AI and robotic systems possibly by 2026 (Walsh University Online, 2022).

Advocating for training nurses now to have a solid base to build upon will be essential to the success of technology advancements. I can advocate this by bringing data, and proof of productivity related to the lack of basic computer skills. Present to the educators of the organization what the needs are, and then help train those that need it, and evaluate them after training to see if educating on basic computer skills will help to maintain productivity.

BY DAY 6 OF WEEK 3

Respond to at least two of your colleagues* on two different days, offering one or more additional interaction strategies in support of the examples/observations shared or by offering further insight to the thoughts shared about the future of these interactions.

*Note: Throughout this program, your fellow students are referred to as colleagues.

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Although most nursing informatics work is done behind the scenes, it has a profound effect on many facets of our industry and daily lives. Healthcare data and information is collected and analyzed by nursing informaticists (NI) to monitor the effects of healthcare treatments. According to research (Threw, 2016). At work, I make regular use of NI for incident report tracking. The system keeps tabs on incidents like these, as well as those involving patient-to-staff and patient-to-patient violence. They monitor the frequency with which these events occur in order to determine which preventative measures are effective and which are not. 

Incorrect medicine delivery is only one example of the kinds of medical mistakes that may be reduced because to NI’s efforts to enhance the healthcare system. It was NI who spearheaded the effort to improve our hospital’s medicine delivery procedures from the ground up (McGonigle & Mastrian et al., 2017). A patient’s wristband, patient record, and medicine label must all match before we may give them a dose of medication. 

Our relationships with NI might be enhanced if we had a more direct channel for reporting problems with the EHR (EHR). While Point Click Care is a fantastic EHR, it does have a lot of nitpicky flaws that we’ve had to work around. Both myself and many of my coworkers find this very irritating. If we could more easily get in touch with the people in charge of our EHR, we could share our discoveries (and our disappointments) and work together to develop solutions. 

In my opinion, the significance of NI expertise will increase in the next years. The field of NI has a lot of space to expand thanks to the development of artificial intelligence (AI) and remote monitoring tools like fall detection gadgets and remote blood sugar monitors. This emphasizes the significance of having clear lines of communication between the frontline healthcare staff and the team responsible for the EHR’s development and the NI division.

References

Kassam, I., Nagle, L., & Strudwick, G. (2017). Informatics competencies for nurse leaders: 

protocol for a scoping review. BMJ open, 7(12), e018855. 

https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018855Links to an external site.

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2022). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (5th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning

Threw, J. (2016, April 19). Big Data Means Big Potential, Challenges for Nurse Execs. Health Leaders.Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

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How Nurse Informaticists or Data/ Technology Specialists Interact with Other Professionals in the Healthcare Organization

            For the purposes of this paper, the technology or data specialist in this case will be referred to as the nurse informaticist. Any interaction between the nurse informaticist and the other professionals in the healthcare organization cannot be talked about if the role of the former has not been defined. The nurse informaticist is a relatively recent role for the advanced practice nurse and involves responsibility for all technological applications used in healthcare.

            The informaticist professional is responsible for the seamless capturing of patient data, adherence to and enforcement of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), access to the technological systems and installation or upgrading of any of the systems such as the electronic health record or EHR system (Alotaibi & Federico, 2017; McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). Since the use of technology to capture patient data is already mandated by law, this means that the nurse informaticist must literally communicate with all the other healthcare professionals in the organization.

Continuous Education (CE)

            Being the healthcare professional with both the technological and medical knowledge, the nurse informaticist is a valuable resources person who regularly gives presentations to staff on how systems are to be used. She teaches the applicability of the systems and their benefits to patients, staff, and the organization. This is one way in which she interacts with the other healthcare professionals in the organization.

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

            As she is the custodian of all the technological systems used in the healthcare organization, she is also the person responsible for designing and disseminating the standard operating procedures or SOPs to be used by all staff when accessing the technology systems. This means that she will also have to interact with the other staff through tools such as internal emails or memos.  

Giving Individual Access or Passwords

            The nurse informaticist is the gatekeeper of all technological systems within the healthcare organization. These include principally the certified electronic health record technology or CEHRT system as well as the clinical decision support or CDS system. For any individual employee in the organization to have access to the system (physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, and so on), they must be given a unique password by the nurse informaticist. She will therefore also interact with them individually at this level.

Troubleshooting

            As the other healthcare professionals utilize the system functionalities such as the CPOE (computerized provider order entry), PDMS (patient data management system), BCMA (bar code medication administration), and eMAR (electronic medication administration record); they will encounter challenges here and there. The only resource person that they will consult first for troubleshooting will be the nurse informaticist. This is therefore yet another way in which she interacts with the other healthcare professionals.

New Technology Applications or Improvements (Project Management) 

            Last but not least, the nurse informaticist is responsible for any new project involving installation of a new system or upgrading of an existing one. This essentially makes them the project manager (Sipes, 2016). They will thus interact with the other healthcare professionals by informing them of the impending change and also educating them of the need for the same.

Future Outlook

            One strategy for improving the above interactions is to strengthen the technology units taught in the basic courses for all healthcare professionals. This will enable them to see the nurse informaticist as a valuable resource and not as a nuisance. The continued evolution of nursing informatics will impact professional interactions in that data will play a very crucial role (Wang et al., 2018). The medium of communication will henceforth be electronic data.          

References

Alotaibi, Y., & Federico, F. (2017). The impact of health information technology on patient safety. Saudi Medical Journal, 38(12), 1173–1180. https://doi.org/10.15537/smj.2017.12.20631Links to an external site.

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K.G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge, 4th ed. Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Sipes, C. (2016). Project management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Nursing Informatics, 252-256. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-658-3-252Links to an external site.

Wang, Y., Kung, L., & Byrd, T.A. (2018). Big data analytics: Understanding its capabilities and potential benefits for healthcare organizations. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 126(1), 3–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2015.12.019Links to an external site.

ADDITIONAL SAMPLE

 Trying to get staff comfortable with a new system can be challenging, communication and education or training in this situation is critical to a successful transition.With proper comprehensive training prior to implementation and ensuring the staff of the benefits of using the new system before going live can alleviate some of the future impediments .

One of the biggest problems faced by Informaticist while deploying a new EMR system is getting staff to learn how to they can use the System to its full capabilities. Staff members can discover methods to use outdated systems or to not efficiently use the new EHR system, even if a practice has “installed” one. When reluctant staff members choose to chart manually rather than electronically, it doubles the effort required because they must later enter the electronic record to chart what was written down. Increasing organizational efficiency is one rationale for putting in place a system like this, but when it’s not used correctly, it negates the objective and leads to double work. Getting employees to use the new System was one of our biggest challenges throughout implementation.

The data that we are able to obtain through the electronic system can allow hospital systems to not only get a better picture of what is going on with the patients individually, but it also helps to see what is going on with the hospital and what improvements we can make on the administrative level to continually improve the hospital which will help improve overall care for the patient.

References

Kassam, I., Nagle, L., & Strudwick, G. (2017). Informatics competencies for nurse leaders: Protocol for a scoping review. BMJ Open7(12), e018855. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018855Links to an external site.

Medical quality management: Theory and practice (3rd ed., 2021). (2020). Springer. Tim Scott; Thomas Rundall; Thomas Vogt; John Hsu & . (2018). Implementing an electronic medical record system (1st ed.). Taylor & Francis.

   The field of nursing is one that absolutely requires a team effort to succeed. To improve the quality of care provided, nurses need to collaborate with nursing informatics and technology experts to streamline the delivery of care (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2017). An example of this experience is : the patient is greeted by a receptionist who is also an expert in the patient’s medical records; the receptionist then directs the patient to the appropriate department. As the nurse’s assessment of the patient reveals multiple problems, including the level of urgency for the patient’s treatment, the patient is then sent to triage, the most crucial point in the patient’s care. 

Triage also keeps tabs on vitals like blood pressure and body mass index before a patient is seen by a doctor. If the system is automated, the results will be transmitted directly to the on-call physician, or they may be noted on the patient’s file. The on-call physician or clinical officer will conduct an examination and make treatment and/or further diagnostics/hospitalization recommendations. The doctor may now give the order for the nurse to resume control in the event of admission or wound dressing. Patients typically follow this routine daily, and proper service delivery calls for the nurse’s expertise and collaboration with other professionals.

     Using technology wisely can help with questions of strategy regarding how these interactions might be enhanced, as it can hasten the processes and eliminate the unnecessary delays that can add costs, or even contribute to the worst cases of loss of life (Macieria et al., 2017). Delays in service delivery, patient and healthcare provider satisfaction, and financial savings can all be avoided with efficient online transit of patient information from the point of admission through triage and on to the doctor’s office. Data are necessary for informed decision-making by nurse executives. The American Association of Nurse Leaders has identified critical informatics competences required for efficient leadership in today technological and data-driven era (Mosier, Roberts, & Englebright, 2019).

     The future of nursing appears bright as nursing informatics continues to develop as a specialty, eliminating most manual tasks and enhancing collaborative interactions, leading to higher quality, greater productivity, and eventual cost savings (Wang, Kung & Byrd, 2018). Improvements in health care service delivery can be anticipated because of the increased efficiency and higher quality of professional interactions made possible by technological advancements.

Thanks for this educative post. Effective and efficient use of technology enhances interactions among co-workers. Proper use of technology limits communication delays that professionals encounter with physical communication. It also hastens communication and limits cost. The use of mobile phones, online audio and web conference platforms, Telemedicine, and many others, eliminate transportation delays and costs involved in scheduling physical conferences. According to the World Economic Forum, 2020, “The past 20 years have greatly shaped how and where we consume media. In the early 2000s, many tech firms focused on expanding communication for work through advanced bandwidth for video streaming and other media consumption that is common today” (World Economic Forum, 2020). 

The evolution of technology improved communication in the global world, “Mobile technological devices with basic features, such as interactive voice response and short message service (SMS) or text messaging, along with more sophisticated devices like smartphones, are increasingly used to support and expand health information technology (HIT) initiatives designed to improve healthcare outcomes across the globe” (Ng et al., 2018, p. 209).

Nurses have essential roles in healthcare and serve the community in many ways to promote healthy lifestyles. Nursing informaticists focus on different technological areas to care for patients, nursing staff, and other healthcare providers. The impact of the evolution of nursing informatics as a specialty and the emergence of new technologies will improve patient outcomes and add value-based care to hospitals by fostering more assertive communication between patients and healthcare providers.

     Nurses are responsible for advocacy. In this situation, data is not sharable to my knowledge with staff nurses at my current workplace. In the effort to advocate for this need for shared data, I would approach this by using my chain of command and bringing this up at a staff meeting. As an incentive to make an argument on the importance, I would use the same platform as McGonigle & Mastrian, 2022, on the importance of how computer science is valuable and contributes to a knowledge base. To facilitate professional development sharable data could benefit the nursing practice as a whole. In my personal experience, I lacked the understanding of why sharable data would be important, but with education and knowledge, I have changed my view on the significance to practice decisions and care.  Collaboration with leadership and the health information technology department could be a starting point for getting involved in informatics and knowledge management. 

References

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2022). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (5th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning.

            According to Maureen Clarke (2021), the nurse informaticist acts as the bridge between a healthcare organization’s systems and its providers and clinical staff. Clarke also states that because of their unique training both as registered nurses (RNs) and information specialists, nurse informaticists understand how all the pieces fit together and provide valuable input into how systems should be designed from a provider standpoint. Nurse informaticist collaborate with doctors, nurses, and technology specialists to ensure effective use of data and technology. A nurse informaticist can enhance technology and data collecting in healthcare because of they already have a foundation in nursing.

            For instance, the hospital where I once worked made it simpler for nurses to determine how much fluid was being infused into the patient. We were able to scan the pump and upload the information into EPIC. Once the patient received all of the fluids, we would record the stop time in EPIC and it would calculated how much fluid the patient had received automatically. For nurses, this function made it simpler to record intravenous fluid consumption. There was always a nurse on hand who was trained to fix the pump if there were any programming issues. Additionally, there was always nurse support or IT support available if there were problems logging onto EPIC.

Strategy On How Interactions Might Be Improved

            Nurse informaticists facilitate communication between clinical and IT staff (ONS Voice, 2021). The article goes on to say that nurse informaticists focus on building strategies for health IT procurement, implementation, maintenance, and optimization in partnership with other clinical operational leaders. They speak two languages, which are technology and healthcare. To determine what works best and what needs to be improved, meetings with nurse informaticist, doctors, nurses and technology specialists should be convened.

Nurse informaticists, according to Garcia-Dia (2021), offered hands-on, in-person training sessions, but switched to a hybrid model because of social distance rules during COVID-19.  All participants can better grasp the technology being used through on-site instruction and practice. Furthermore, it guarantees that healthcare professionals’ access to technology is improving. Nursing informatics defined by the American Nurse Association (ANA) “is the specialty that integrates nursing science with multiple information and analytical sciences to identify, define, manage and communicate data, information, knowledge and wisdom in nursing practice” (HIMSS, 2023). Given that statement, patient care, and the healthcare experience is the core principle of nursing informatics.

Nursing Informatics and Technology Evolution

            Being that healthcare is constantly changing and there is always space for improvement, nursing informatics is a specialization that is constantly evolving. Every day, nurses use technology to connect with the interdisciplinary team and record data. Solodev (2023) explains the various ways in which technology has helped nursing. Electronic health records (EHRs) which are digital records of a patients’ medical history, are one advantage that is addressed in the article. The use of electronic records has reduced the workload for nurses and improved the precision and accessibility of patient records. The future of nursing will bring both positive and negative outcomes as technology advances. It is crucial for nurses to maintain their focus on providing hands-on care for patients while resisting the urge to let technology take over completely.

References

Clarke, M. (2021, October 28). What Is Nursing Informatics? Simpler. Retrieved June 14, 2023, from https://www.symplr.com/blog/what-is-nursing-informatics

Garcia-Dia, M. J. (2021). Nursing informatics. Nursing Management52(5), 56. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.numa.0000743444.08164.b4

HIMSS. (2023). What is Nursing Informatics? HIMSShttps://www.himss.org/resources/what-nursing-informatics

ONS Voice. (2021, August 3). Nursing Informaticists Are the Backbone of Technology-Driven Carehttps://voice.ons.org/news-and-views/nursing-informaticists-are-the-backbone-of-technology-driven-care

Solodev. (2023, January 5). How Technology is Impacting Nursing Practice. How Technology is Impacting Nursing Practice. Retrieved June 14, 2023, from https://avanthealthcare.com/blog/how-technology-is-impacting-nursing-practice.stml

NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Discussion_Rubric

NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Discussion_Rubric
CriteriaRatingsPts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMain Posting50 to >44.0 pts Excellent Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources. … Supported by at least three current, credible sources. … Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style. 44 to >39.0 pts Good Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. … At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth. … Supported by at least three credible sources. … Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style. 39 to >34.0 pts Fair Responds to some of the discussion question(s). … One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed. … Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. … Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. … Post is cited with two credible sources. … Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors. … Contains some APA formatting errors. 34 to >0 pts Poor Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately. … Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria. … Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. … Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. … Contains only one or no credible sources. … Not written clearly or concisely. … Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors. … Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMain Post: Timeliness10 to >0.0 pts Excellent Posts main post by day 3. 0 pts Poor Does not post by day 3.10 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFirst Response18 to >16.0 pts Excellent Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. … Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. … Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. … Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. … Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. … Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed. … Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 16 to >14.0 pts Good Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings. … Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. … Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed. … Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources. … Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 14 to >12.0 pts Fair Response is on topic and may have some depth. … Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. … Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. … Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited. 12 to >0 pts Poor Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. … Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. … Responses to faculty questions are missing. … No credible sources are cited.18 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSecond Response17 to >15.0 pts Excellent Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. … Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. … Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. … Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. … Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. … Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed. … Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 15 to >13.0 pts Good Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings. … Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. … Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed. … Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources. … Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 13 to >11.0 pts Fair Response is on topic and may have some depth. … Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. … Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. … Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited. 11 to >0 pts Poor Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. … Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. … Responses to faculty questions are missing. … No credible sources are cited.17 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeParticipation5 to >0.0 pts Excellent Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days. 0 pts Poor Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.5 pts
Total Points: 100

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