EXPLAIN THE RISK FACTORS FOR OSTEOPOROSIS NRS 410

EXPLAIN THE RISK FACTORS FOR OSTEOPOROSIS NRS 410

Topic 5 DQ 2
Aug 15-19, 2022
Explain the risk factors for osteoporosis. What can a nurse do to help manage this health condition to restore the patient to optimal health?
Barb McGraw
Aug 15, 2022, 7:10 AM
Replies to Barb McGraw
Class, can men have osteoporosis? Please explain.

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Mary Bonillos
replied toBarb McGraw
Aug 16, 2022, 8:19 AM
Replies to Barb McGraw
Women have a higher incidence of osteoporosis than men, but men are also at risk. One of every five men is estimated to experience fragility fractures at least once in their lifetime (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). Men have greater bone mass than women, bone loss generally begins later and advances slower than in women, and men often develop secondary osteoporosis. 20-40% of osteoporosis in women is secondary to extraskeletal diseases, and this percentage rises to 65% in men (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). Some risk factors include family history, chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, low testosterone levels, medications such as glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, and chemotherapies, and lack of physical activity, alcoholism, and smoking, among others (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). Literature suggests that there are few studies on osteoporosis in men and that the condition is underdiagnosed and undertreated (Rinonapoli et al., 2021).
Reference
Rinonapoli, G., Ruggiero, C., Meccariello, L., Bisaccia, M., Ceccarini, P., & Caraffa, A. (2021). Osteoporosis in men: A review of an underestimated bone condition. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 22(4), 2105. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22042105
• Barb McGraw
replied toMary Bonillos
Aug 17, 2022, 6:54 PM
Replies to Mary Bonillos
Mary, how and what would you teach a male who has osteoporosis?
• Mary Bonillos
replied toBarb McGraw
Aug 18, 2022, 9:26 PM(edited)
• Replies to Barb McGraw
Educating patients on risk factors and ways to prevent osteoporosis or, if already diagnosed, how to avoid disease complications is essential. Education for males is similar to that for females. First, the nurse would need to assess what the patient knows about osteoporosis and the patient’s learning preference. Depending on the patient’s preferred way of learning, education can be provided through printed materials, videos, and online resources. The Bone Health & Osteoporosis Foundation (https://www.bonehealthandosteoporosis.org/) offers many patient resources and support, including educational materials, podcasts, blogs, and support groups.
Education would include the importance of increasing calcium and vitamin D intake, eating a healthy diet, and limiting alcohol. Regular exercise may decrease fracture risk by improving bone mass, strengthening muscles, and improving balance, thus may reduce fall risk (Rosen, 2021). Smoking cessation is another lifestyle change that must be emphasized, as smoking is known to speed up the bone loss (Rosen, 2021). Fall prevention strategies are necessary, as falling increases the risk of osteoporotic fractures. Nurses must educate patients on safety measures such as removing items that could cause tripping, slipping, and falling, like rugs and electrical cords, ensuring adequate lighting in and around the home, getting regular eye exams and wearing their glasses, and avoiding walking in unfamiliar or uneven areas (Rosen, 2021). Education should also include medications prescribed to treat osteoporosis, for example, oral biphosphonates, have specific instructions on how and when to take them. In addition, the nurse must educate patients on potential side effects and complications with medications and instruct them to keep all doctor’s appointments for follow-up and monitoring.
Reference
Rosen, H. N. (2021). Patient education: Osteoporosis prevention and treatment (beyond the basics) (C. J. Rosen & J. E. Mulder, Eds.). UpToDate. Retrieved August 18, 2022, from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/osteoporosis-prevention-and-treatment-beyond-the-basics?csi=0f1cb00b-eff6-4d01-98f5-e89e35c45a56%26source=contentShare
• Torri Scott
replied toBarb McGraw
Aug 21, 2022, 9:30 AM
• •
o Replies to Barb McGraw
I would educate the patient and tell him first that testosterone deficiency is the most common cause of male osteoporosis. For low-testosterone men, doctors may advise testosterone replacement to build bone mass. I would inform the patient that we must look at the testosterone to estrogen conversion. Estrogen preserves bone density in men and women. The patient may need small doses of estrogen. The patient needs plenty of calcium and vitamin D.
• Sandra Jeudy
replied toBarb McGraw
Aug 18, 2022, 8:50 AM
Replies to Barb McGraw
Hi Professor McGraw,
Osteoporosis can affect anyone, either men or women of all races. While osteoporosis is more common in women, men are also at risk of having the disease (Rinonapoli et al., 2021). However, there are significant alterations between men and women concerning osteoporosis. For men, bone loss starts at an advanced age and progresses more slowly. Osteoporosis in men can be triggered by various diseases such as intestinal disorders, which result in poor absorption of bone-boosting nutrients. Prostate cancer medication can predispose men to low bone mass and fractures. Low testosterone production can also affect bone mass.
Reference
Rinonapoli, G., Ruggiero, C., Meccariello, L., Bisaccia, M., Ceccarini, P., & Caraffa, A. (2021). Osteoporosis in men: a review of an underestimated bone condition. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 22(4), 2105. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22042105

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