DESCRIBE SOME OF THE MORE COMMON PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES AND ABNORMAL FINDINGS ASSCOCIATED WITH MUSCULOSKELETAL, METABOLIC, AND MULTISYSTEM HEALTH DYSFUNCTIONS NRS 410

DESCRIBE SOME OF THE MORE COMMON PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES AND ABNORMAL FINDINGS ASSCOCIATED WITH MUSCULOSKELETAL, METABOLIC, AND MULTISYSTEM HEALTH DYSFUNCTIONS NRS 410

Topic 5 DQ 1

Describe some of the more common pathophysiological changes and abnormal findings associated with musculoskeletal, metabolic, and multisystem health dysfunctions. Explain what symptoms are associated with the findings and how these affect patient function.

Class, can a patient have a musculoskeletal, metabolic and multisystem issue at the same time? Please explain.

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·  Replies

Yes, a patient can have a musculoskeletal, metabolic, and multisystem issue at the same time. The inability for a person’s metabolic pathways to aid in the process of macro and micronutrient absorption, leads to many deficiencies including musculoskeletal deficiencies such as osteomalacia, a metabolic bone disease characterized by bone demineralization. Individuals who do not get the right amount of essential dietary nutrients, or who have pathological barriers with absorption are more prone to osteomyelitis, a bone infection (Cheever, 2018), which can lead to sepsis, a multisystem complexity.

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Reference

Cheever, J.L.H.K. H. (2018). Lippincott coursepoint enhanced for brunner & suddarth’s textbook of medical-surgical nursing (14th Edition). Wolters kluwer health. https://coursepoint.vitalsource.com/books/9781975123383

·  Sandra Jeudy

replied toBarb McGraw

Aug 18, 2022, 8:48 AM

·  Replies to Barb McGraw

Hi Professor McGraw,

I believe any outcome is possible regarding health issues, and we cannot rule out possibilities. Therefore, although it may be a rare occurrence, a patient can simultaneously have musculoskeletal, metabolic, and multisystem issues. A multisystem issue characterized by inflammatory issues can arise due to various provocations, including tissue injury, infectious agents, autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, a musculoskeletal disorder, and metabolic issues such as obesity (Collins et al., 2018). A patient can therefore have all these conditions at the same time where one is a contributing factor to the other.

Reference

Collins, K. H., Herzog, W., MacDonald, G. Z., Reimer, R. A., Rios, J. L., Smith, I. C., … & Hart, D. A. (2018). Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and musculoskeletal disease: Common inflammatory pathways suggest a central role in the loss of muscle integrity. Frontiers in Physiology9, 112. https://doi.org/10.3389%2Ffphys.2018.00112

·  Dorothy Jayne Ray

replied toBarb McGraw

Aug 18, 2022, 9:58 PM

·  Replies to Barb McGraw

Yes a person can have all three disorders. I see it primarily in the elder patient population. For example, a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have limited mobility. ”People with RA have an increased risk of diabetes, while diabetes can also raise the risk of RA” (Fletcher, 2021). Due to the limited mobility, they develop a diabetic foot ulcer that becomes so infected that it turns into osteomyelitis or cellulitis. Healing the sore may be difficult because of the patient’s diabetes. If the patient does not get the appropriate treatment or the treatment does not work then the infection may spread to the body. This can cause sepsis or septic shock. Also, if the patient ends up getting surgery for an amputation of the foot, then a post op complication is again, risk of sepsis.

Musculoskeletal dysfunction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

Metabolic dysfunction: Diabetes

Multisystem dysfunction: sepsis or septic shock

Reference

Fletcher, J. (2021). What is the link between rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes? Retreieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/rheumatoid-arthritis-and-diabetes

·  Torri Scott

replied toBarb McGraw

Aug 19, 2022, 3:50 PM

·  Replies to Barb McGraw

Yes, it can. The musculoskeletal system is an organ system that enhances body movement. The system entails voluntary muscles and connective tissues, for example, tendons, cartilage, joints, bones, fascia, and ligaments. These system components provide stability, support, and body movements. The musculoskeletal system might incur pathophysiological changes that might affect its proper function and lead to system inefficiencies. First, the system might develop tendinitis. Tendinitis is the irritation or inflammation of the thick fibrous cords that connect the muscles to the bone(Clegg, 2018). Tendinitis can extend to any tendon. Still, the condition is more prevalent around the heels, elbows, knees, and shoulders(Clegg, 2018). The second is rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by the inflammation of the joints in the feet and hands(Raza et al., 2019). As a result, RA patients experience joint stiffness, which can persist for one hour after inactivity or awakening.

References

Clegg, P. (2018). Functional consequences of tendonitis in OA. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage26, S2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2018.02.014

Raza, K., Holers, V. M., & Gerlag, D. (2019). Nomenclature for the phases of the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical Therapeutics41(7), 1279-1285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2019.04.013

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