In a 750-1,000 word paper, create a plan of action to incorporate health promotion strategies for this family NRS 429

In a 750-1,000 word paper, create a plan of action to incorporate health promotion strategies for this family NRS 429

NRS 429 Family Assessment Part II

In a 750-1,000 word paper, create a plan of action to incorporate health promotion strategies for this family NRS 429

The conditions under which people are born, live, play, work, learn, worship, and age are referred to as social determinates of health (SDOH). These conditions influence function, health, and quality of life (QoL). Health and health care, education, social and community context, economic stability, and neighborhood and built environment are the five broad categories of SDOHs (Clements, 2018). Family Y, an African-American lower-middle-class family, was assessed in the previous assignment. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SDOH related to the family’s health status, propose age-appropriate screening strategies for family members, and investigate a health model that can be used in a plan of action.

SDOH Has an Impact on the Family’s Health

Education, economic stability, health and health care, and neighborhood are SDOHs that influence Family Y’s health status. All of the family members have completed high school or higher, allowing them to understand the significance of healthy lifestyle practices and the consequences of unhealthy habits. According to Zajacova and Lawrence (2018), people with more education live healthier and longer lives than those with less education. Furthermore, people with low education levels are more likely to engage in unhealthy habits such as tobacco use, poor dietary habits, and a lack of physical activity.

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Due to the family members’ high education levels, they were able to obtain income opportunities that allowed them to purchase private medical insurance and, as a result, access healthcare services, including specialized services. According to Zajacova and Lawrence (2018), education contributes to better, more stable sources of income that bring higher income and allow families to build wealth that can be used to improve their health. Furthermore, the family lives in a secure neighborhood with easy access to clean water, nutritious foods, healthcare facilities, and transportation. This has had a significant impact on the family’s health because they are no longer susceptible to water-borne and water-wash diseases. Furthermore, having access to healthy foods reduces the consumption of junk foods, lowering the risk of lifestyle diseases (Clements, 2018). Finally, the family’s access to healthcare facilities has allowed them to obtain necessary and specialized healthcare services, which has improved their health.

Family Y members are more likely to develop chronic illnesses as a result of risk factors such as a family history of diabetes and hypertension, as well as race. As a result, age-appropriate screenings are critical for identifying chronic diseases at an early stage and intervening to treat or delay their progression. Colorectal cancer screening is appropriate for Mr. Y (62 years old with controlled Type 2 Diabetes and hypertension).

The US Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF) recommends colorectal cancer screening in adults aged 45 to 75 years (USPSTF, n.d.). He also requires cholesterol screening because he is at risk of heart disease. Because of the risk of cataracts and diabetic foot ulcers, an annual eye and foot exam is also recommended.

Blood pressure, blood sugar, colorectal cancer, cholesterol, cervical cancer, and mammography screening are all age-appropriate screenings for Mrs. Y (59 years). The USPSTF recommends screening for hypertension at the age of 18 and diabetes at the age of 35. Furthermore, it recommends cervical cancer screening in women aged 30-65 years, three times a year with cervical cytology alone and five times a year with high-risk HPV testing alone (USPSTF, n.d.). The USPSTF also recommends biennial screening mammography for women aged 50 to 74. Blood pressure, blood sugar, a monthly self-breast exam, biannual dental check-ups, and cervical cancer screening are all recommended for the daughters (35, 32, and 28 years old). According to USPSTF recommendations, the appropriate cervical cancer screening for a 28-year-old is three-yearly cervical cytology alone (USPSTF, n.d.). Furthermore, blood pressure and biannual dental check-ups are recommended screenings for the son (23 years).