DQ: Describe a health promotion model used to initiate behavioral changes NRS 429

DQ: Describe a health promotion model used to initiate behavioral changes NRS 429

DQ: Describe a health promotion model used to initiate behavioral changes NRS 429

Pender’s health promotion model had the goal of providing “a framework to understand health promotion behaviors by recognizing the family as the unit of assessment and intervention” (Whitney, 2018). Nola Pender created it in 1982 after noticing that providers were primarily focused on disease treatment rather than the patient’s environment and lifestyle choices. The model evaluates an individual’s characteristics and experiences, taking into account past successes and failures, personal interpersonal and situational influences, and commitment to the plan of action (Pender, 2010). According to Pender’s model, self-perceived barriers are a barrier to taking action. If influences such as family or the external environment are not aligned with care goals, they can be barriers. According to Pender, patients are more likely to commit to essential changes in self-care if family and other support people model the behavior (Pender, 2010). Pender’s model works because it broadens the patient’s perspective in the healthcare setting.

S. Whitney (2018). Styles of teaching and learning Health Promotion: Health and Wellness Across the Continuum, Grand Canyon University (Eds.). https://lc.gcumedia.com/nrs429vn/health-promotion-health-and-wellness-across-the-continuum/v1.1/#/chapter/1

N. Pender (2010). Manuel for the Health Promotion Model https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/85350/?sequence=1

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The participatory health model includes both providers and patients and their families. This model makes use of group decision making. This allows patients and their families to discuss options, treatments, and desires with their providers. They collaborate as a group. With open communication, patients can receive adequate treatment while also having a voice in their own care. Because there is respect for each party, this model can aid in behavioral changes, which leads to common goals. Patients will be more willing to participate in their care and be more compliant if they believe their provider respects them and understands their needs. Lower grade level education, patients’ personal beliefs, or even religion could all be barriers to learning for a patient. If your patient has a low level of education, they may not fully comprehend what is going on or the medical terminology used. That being said, it is advantageous to use simple terms and then ensure that the patient truly understands what you are saying to them. A patient’s religion may prevent them from making certain healthcare decisions, deferring the decision to a husband or brother, or simply prohibiting them from receiving certain treatments in general. If a patient does not truly want to change or learn, no matter how hard you try, they will not fully comprehend what you are attempting to teach them. They must genuinely desire the change and be willing to make the necessary efforts or sacrifices to improve their health.