Discussion: The Inclusion of Nurses in the Systems Development Life Cycle

NURS 6051 Discussion: The Inclusion of Nurses in the Systems Development Life Cycle

Discussion: The Inclusion of Nurses in the Systems Development Life Cycle

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The Inclusion of Nurses in the Systems Development Life Cycle SAMPLE 1

The involvement of nurses in every stage of the SDLC is critical when purchasing and implementing new health information technology systems. The primary implications associated with the failure are inclusive of the potential loss of engagement of the nurses are the primary care providers since their attention is inadequately captured (East & Robinson, 2017). The next complexity associated with the practice is creating an environment that lacks trust in the change process and reliability in the competence and experience of the change implementers. Moreover, this is attributed to the concept that new systems integrate competing priorities that are viable to decline the interest of target nurses (French-Bravo & Crow, 2018). As a result, this triggers instances of frustration and employee burnout. The other implication is that conceptualized individual goals and nurse beliefs and ideologies may not align with the organizational values. Hence, this contributes to a loss of individualistic connection with the new system leading to inefficiency.

The initial involvement of nurses triggers commitment to the proposed systems as they are empowered and encouraged to participate in different stages of the SDLC. Further, the participation helps overcome the challenges by allowing for the connection of the nurses to the delivery care systems leading to personalized relationships and motivation when serving patient populations (Chreim et al., 2020). Moreover, this effectively prompts dedication of time and efforts towards implementing the new system. If the nurses are not effectively involved in the process, it implies that the first contact with the system is during the implementation. It limits the nurse’s scope of the specific details integrated making, which potentially delays the execution process (East & Robinson, 2017). In my organizational setting, I have been involved in planning a new healthcare technology that aims to improve service provision to patients by minimizing the time spent in consultation and prescription. The involvement eased the implementation process as I understood the core elements of the proposals and could help others execute the program effectively, resulting in quality patient outcomes.

References

Chreim, S., Williams, B. B., Janz, L., & Dastmalchian, A. (2020). Change agency in a primary   health care context: The case of distributed leadership. Health care management       review35(2), 187-199.

East, L., & Robinson, J. (2017). Change in the process: bringing about change in health care through action research. Journal of clinical nursing3(1), 57-61.

French-Bravo, M. & Crow, G. (2018). Shared Governance: The Role of Buy-In In Bringing             About Change. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 20(2).

https://www.onlinenursingessays.com/discussion-the-inclusion-of-nurses-in-the-systems-development-life-cycle/

Debora, geat point of views.

I am also agreeing with you in reference to The initial involvement of nurses triggers commitment to the proposed systems as they are empowered and encouraged to participate in different stages of the SDLC. We need nurses in al aspect of SDLC process. According to McGonigle and Mastrian (2018), the Systems Delopement Life Cycle (SDLC) is similar to the nursing progress were nurses use assessment, diagnosis, planning, implenting, and evaluation when caring for our patients.

It is also essential for nurses to be involved in the initial phases of the SDLC process. There are several issues should be considered before proceeding
with an analysis plan:

1. It may be necessary to adjust for patient care
unit, timeofday, or patient volume to account
for possible confounding.

2. Consider the structure and roles of staff,
especially between organizations. For example,
one site may hire nursing assistants; therefore,
nurses in this organization may perform less
administrative work than those in an
organization without nursing assistants.

3. Your data collection and analysis plan should be
based on sound methodology. To achieve valid
results, consider planning your analysis with the
input of a trained statistician to determine
sample size and appropriate statistical
techniques. It is not uncommon to begin
analyzing data, only to find the original
statistical plan was flawed, leaving you with
data that is inadequate for analysis.

4. Because of the complex environments of
inpatient organizations, implementing health
IT is not just a technical undertaking. Multiple
factors from the implementation could cause
changes in nurses’ work, including policy
changes and training. Consider having a trained
human factors professional review your plan

Reference

McGonigle, D., & Mastrain, K.G (2018). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th Ed.). Jones  and Bartlett learning.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (n.d.a). Health IT evaluation toolkit and evaluation measures quick reference guide. Retrieved January 26, 2022, from https://digital.ahrq.gov/health-it-evaluationkit

Discussion: The Inclusion of Nurses in the Systems Development Life Cycle

Debora,

According to McGonigle and Mastrian (2022), while designing a strategic plan, the design must consider the organization’s position in the broader healthcare delivery system and analyze and suggest answers to those demands. Nursing is a vital part of health organizations that provide patient care. Information management is an essential aim of nursing to deliver high-quality patient care. It would necessitate focusing on features of preventative care and selecting appropriate patient-care actions by utilizing various technologies to handle patient care in various situations. Therefore, nurses should take the lead and engage themselves at every level of the SDLC for the long-term viability of a healthcare information system (Verma & Gupta, 2017). McGonigle and Mastrian (2022) state that united efforts to create integrated and interoperable systems will define the future of health care. Do you believe that nurses’ engagement in a healthcare information system is required for its long-term effectiveness?

References

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K.G. (2022). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (5thed.).

Jones and Bartlett Learning.

Verma, M.P., & Gupta, S. (2017). Software Development for Nursing: Role of Nursing Informatics. Int. J. Nur. Edu. and Research. 5(2): 203-207. doi: 10.5958/2454-2660.2017.00044.8

SAMPLE 2

           The seven phases of system development life cycle (SDLC) consist of: (Alhazme, 2014) “planning, analysis, detailed system design, implementation, and support”. Nurses make up the most significant percentage of healthcare workers in the hospital. They are the ones who use the charting systems the most. Therefore, it is essential to involve nurses in each stage of the SDLC. The nurse can help make critical decisions in the planning phase that can make a significant difference in the efficiency of the floor nurse. A nurse’s involvement in the support phase is exceptionally paramount to the success of the new health information technology system. Nurses can report ongoing support and maintenance issues to ensure the new system is working fluently. Including nurses in the SDLC will help increase their satisfaction with the latest health information systems change. According to an article (Wang, 2019), “As informatics grows and the specialty of nursing informatics expands its reach, nursing science will grapple with more meaningful ways to harness, learn from, study, and apply big data to clinical questions”. In other words, nurses’ involvement in informatics will only become more common and more critical. Another article written by nurses researching nurse involvement in digital health transformation also stated that nurses need more involvement with health information technology. They reported that nurses (Risling, 2020), “a lack of familiarity with design-thinking and associated practical experience impedes nursing voices in this area”. Nurses could overcome the lack of familiarity with design-thinking that this article mentioned as they gain more experience with SDLC involvement.

I was recently involved in technology change at my hospital when I had the opportunity to talk to a worker in nurse informatics. I requested that he put all of the nurse’s required documents to be filled out each shift under the ‘required documents’ tab. As simple as that sounds. Within a week, he did implement this change. This helped to create efficiency for the nurses, so we weren’t searching for flowsheets under different tabs for multiple patients. In addition, there is less of a chance of nurses forgetting to fill out a flowsheet, which is essential because the hospital bills the patient’s insurance off this work.

References

AlHazme, R. H., Rana, A. M., & De Lucca, M. (2014). Development and implementation of a clinical and business intelligence system for the Florida health data warehouse. Online journal of public health informatics6(2), e182. https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v6i2.5249

Risling, T. L., & Risling, D. E. (2020). Advancing nursing participation in user-centred design. Journal of research in nursing : JRN25(3), 226–238. https://doi.org/10.1177/1744987120913590

Wang, J., Gephart, S. M., Mallow, J., & Bakken, S. (2019). Models of collaboration and dissemination for nursing informatics innovations in the 21st century. Nursing outlook67(4), 419–432. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.outlook.2019.02.003

SAMPLE 3

Discussion – Week 9

Milstead and Short (2019) note nurses outnumber all other healthcare professionals in the United States.  Nurses have a professional obligation to advocate for patients (Walden University, 2018).  When nurses are not involved in each stage of the system development life cycle (SDLC) when purchasing and implementing new health information technology systems, the opportunity to improve patient outcomes decreases.  During the planning stage of the SDLC, nurses understand the needs of the patients and can voice challenges attempting to provide those needs.  Not having a nurse’s input can produce frustration when implementing the new system due to a lack of understanding.  Having nurses during the design and development of purchasing and implementing a new health information technology system is vital because we are the healthcare professionals who will input the required information.  Required information can be missed if there is no nurse involvement during this stage because the design may not be user-friendly.  As nurse leaders, we can provide cohesiveness to ensure there are solutions for all (Kearney-Nunnery, 2020).  Nurses who access those systems can contribute to understanding what relevant information providers need, time management, what does not work, or what is seen as redundant and being user-friendly.  Nurses can provide critical feedback during the analytical stage of the SDLC because nurses understand that policy and programs should be measured by how efficient and effective a new health information technology system will be.  Nurse input is vital during all stages of SDLC because, as knowledge workers, we can use critical thinking, research data, experience, and keep all stakeholders in mind to produce desired outcomes.  There will be since of inclusion by all parties when there is nurse involvement during all stages of SDLC.

References

Kearney-Nunnery, R. (2020). Advancing your career: Concepts of professional nursing (7th ed.). F.A. Davis.

Milstead, J. A., & Short, N. M. (2019). Health policy and politics: A nurse’s guide (6th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Walden University, LLC. (Producer). (2018). Program Policy and Evaluation [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Name: NURS_5051_Module05_Week09_Discussion_Rubric

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)

Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)

Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)

Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)

Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Main Post: Timeliness
Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)

Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Second Response
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)

Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Participation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100