Data Descriptive Statistics Paper Discussion

Data Descriptive Statistics Paper Discussion

Data Descriptive Statistics Paper Discussion

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Confidence Level(95.0%) 2.805475342

In data analysis, measures of central tendency are essential when it comes to the understanding of different attributes of the dataset (Weaver 17). In most cases, it reveals the characteristics of the study participants or respondents, their mean, mode, the median, maximum and minimum numbers. The following tables indicate the descriptive statistics for the National Cancer Institute 2018.

Table 2: Asian / Pacific Islander (includes Hispanic)
Mean 38.5125
Standard Error 0.595810023
Median 38.9
Mode 36.6
Standard Deviation 2.383240091
Sample Variance 5.679833333
Kurtosis -0.712232536
Skewness -0.555307749
Range 7.8
Minimum 34
Maximum 41.8
Sum 616.2
Count 16

 

Table 3: Black (includes Hispanic)
Mean 70.06875
Standard Error 1.685025191
Median 71.4
Mode #N/A
Standard Deviation 6.740100766
Sample Variance 45.42895833
Kurtosis -0.949652546
Skewness -0.507960145
Range 21.6
Minimum 57.4
Maximum 79
Sum 1121.1
Count 16

 

Table 4: Hispanic (any race)
Mean 31.49375
Standard Error 0.724538287
Median 32.1
Mode 34.1
Standard Deviation 2.898153148
Sample Variance 8.399291667
Kurtosis -0.88797923
Skewness -0.611418136
Range 9
Minimum 26
Maximum 35
Sum 503.9
Count 16

 

 

 

Table 5: White (includes Hispanic)
Mean 62.725
Standard Error 1.278720063
Median 64.55
Mode 65.8
Standard Deviation 5.114880253
Sample Variance 26.162
Kurtosis -1.087933179
Skewness -0.55685628
Range 15.6
Minimum 53.2
Maximum 68.8
Sum 1003.6
Count 16

 

Table 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 indicate the rate of cancer in the American Indian, Asian, Black, Hispanic and whites races per 100,000 people

Data Descriptive Statistics Paper Discussion
Data Descriptive Statistics Paper Discussion

respectively. The black community has the highest rate of cancer infection, followed by whites, including Hispanics (Merola et al. 32). The Hispanic race has the lowest rate of cancer prevalence per 100, 000 people. The data was recorded for 16 successive years from the year 2000 to 2015. Among the American Indian participants, the highest rate per 100, 000 people was 51.7 while the lowest rate was 32; this was recorded in the year 2004 (Bilimoria et al. 13). On the other hand, for the Asian participants, the maximum rate was 41.8 while the minimum rate was 34 as recorded in the year 2000 and 2014, respectively. For the blacks, Hispanics and whites, the maximum rates of infections were 79, 35, and 68.8 respectively. The means rate for the American Indians, Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites who participated in the research was 43.275, 38.5125, 70.06875, 31.49375, and 62.725 respectively.

Table 6: Measures of Variation

Ethnicity/Race     American Indian / Alaska Native (includes Hispanic) Asian / Pacific Islander (includes Hispanic) Black (includes Hispanic) Hispanic (any race) White (includes Hispanic)
      Variance 27.71933 5.6798 45.429 8.399 26.162
Standard Deviation 5.265 2.383 6.740 2.8981 5.115
Maximum 51.7 41.8 79 35 68.8
Minimum 32 34 57.4 26 53.2
Range 19.7 7.8 21.6 9 15.6

 

Table 6 indicates measures of variation for the National Cancer Institute of 2018. From the table, a high rate of variation was recorded among the black race. In other words, the black participants had the highest rate of cancer infection per 100,000 people with high variation.  Data for the Asian/Pacific Islander showed the least variation with 5.6798. The variations represented the deviation from the means for the rate of cancer infection per 100, 000 people. The range for the American Indians, Asian, Blacks, Hispanics, and whites were recorded as 19.7, 7.8, 21.6, 9, and 15.6 respectively.

Works Cited

Bilimoria, Karl Y., et al. “The National Cancer Data Base: a powerful initiative to improve cancer care in the United States.” Annals of surgical oncology 15.3 (2008): 683-690.

Merola, Roberta, et al. “PCA3 in prostate cancer and tumor aggressiveness detection on 407 high-risk patients: a National Cancer Institute experience.” Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 34.1 (2015): 15.

Weaver, Kathleen F. An Introduction to Statistical Analysis in Research: With Applications in the Biological and Life Sciences. , 2017. Print.