Assignment: Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment: Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment: Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT: Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Use these references.There is only 14. Please find out one more related to this
topic

Amy J. Bok, (2013). “Meanings to rehabilitation nurses when
institutionalized older persons fall or a fall is prevented “. Retrieved from.utoledo.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1049&context=theses-dissertations”>http://utdr.utoledo.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1049&context=theses-dissertations;
Bulter, M., Norton, R., Lee-Joe,
T., Coggan C. (2011) “Preventing falls and fall-related injuries among older
people living in institutions: current practice and future opportunities.” NewZealand Medical Journal, 111(1074)
Cameron, ID., Stafford, B.,
Cumming, RG, Birks, C., Kurrle, SE, Lockwood, K., Quine, S., Finnegan, T., Salkeld,
G. (2013) “Hip protectors improve falls self-efficacy.” Age & Ageing, 29(1)
Carter, ND,
Kannus P. Khan KM. (2011) “Exercise in the prevention of falls in older people:
a systematic literature review examining the rationale and the evidence.” Sports Medicine.
31(6)
“Developing an Effective Evaluation Plan” (2011). Retrieved from.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/cdc-evaluation-workbook-508.pdf”>http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/cdc-evaluation-workbook-508.pdf
Helga E Breimaier, Ruud JG Halfens, (2015). “Effectiveness of
multifaceted and tailored strategies to implement a fall-prevention guideline
into acute care nursing practice: a before-and-after, mixed-method study using
a participatory action research approach”.
Karen B. Pearson, MLIS, Andrew F. Coburn, (2011). “Evidence-based
Falls Prevention in Critical Access Hospitals”. Retrieved from.flexmonitoring.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/PolicyBrief24_Falls-Prevention.pdf”>http://www.flexmonitoring.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/PolicyBrief24_Falls-Prevention.pdf.
LeeAnnaSpive, Patricia Hart, (2010). “Evidence based Intervention
for Preventing Falls in Acute Care Hospitals”. Retrieved from.medline.com/media/mkt/pdf/White-Paper-Evidence-Based-Interventions-for-Preventing-Falls-Acute-Care-Hospitals.pdf”>https://www.medline.com/media/mkt/pdf/White-Paper-Evidence-Based-Interventions-for-Preventing-Falls-Acute-Care-Hospitals.pdf.
Liu,
B.A., Topper, A.K., Reeves, R.A. Gryfe,
C and Maki, B.E. (2006)”Falls among older people: Relationship to
medication use and hypotension.” Journal
of AmericanGeriatric Society 43, 1141-1145.
Lola
Butcher (2013) Hospitals work to prevent patient falls. Retrieved from.hhnmag.com/articles/6404-Hospitals-work-to-prevent-patient-falls”>http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/6404-Hospitals-work-to-prevent-patient-falls
Serena SL Koh,
Elizabeth Manias, (2011). “Nurses’ perceived barriers to the
implementation of a Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline in Singapore
hospitals”. Retrieved from.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-8-105″>http://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-8-105
Sharon Silow, Carroll, Tanya Alteras, (2010). “HOSPITAL QUALITY
IMPROVEMENT: STRATEGIES AND LESSONS FROM U.S. HOSPITALS “. Retrieved from.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/files/publications/fund-report/apr/hospital-quality-improvement–strategies-and-lessons-from-u-s–hospitals/silow-carroll_hosp_quality_improve_strategies_lessons_1009-pdf.pdf”>http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/files/publications/fund-report/apr/hospital-quality-improvement–strategies-and-lessons-from-u-s–hospitals/silow-carroll_hosp_quality_improve_strategies_lessons_1009-pdf.pdf.
Tibbits, G.M.
(2010) “Patients who fall: How to predict and prevent injuries.” Geriatrics
24-31
Weigand JV.
Gerson LW. (2010) “Preventive care in
the emergency department: should emergency departments institute a fall prevention
program for elder patients?” Academic
Emergency Medicine, 8(8): 823-6.
.

Nurse Burnout: Review of
Literature
Name
Grand Canyon University:
NRS-441V
December 29, 2014

Nurse Burnout: Review of
LiteratureReview of LiteratureAssis Tavares, K. F., de Oliveira Souza, N. D., da Silva,
L. D., & Fonseca Kestenberg, C. C. (2014). Prevalence of burnout syndrome
among resident nurses. Acta Paulista De
Enfermagem, 27(3), 260-265. This
article discusses a cross-sectional study of forty eight nursing
residents. The study aims to detect the
occurrence of burnout among nursing residents in Brazil. The information was gathered from July to
September of 2011 using the Maslach Burnout Inventory Survey. Demographics and work features were also
analyzed. The nurses were all
second-year residents from several different specialties among the hospital. Results indicate close to twenty one percent
of the nurses in the study presented with alterations in emotional exhaustion,
depersonalization, and personal accomplishments, suggesting these nurses
exhibit burnout syndrome. Additionally,
these nurses have comparable demographics and work features. The design of the study limited the ability
to form relationships with the nursing residents. This study revealed several aspects for
healthcare workers and organizations to take into consideration while
preventing and reducing burnout in the future. Burtson, P., & Stichler, J. (2010). Nursing work
environment and nurse caring: relationship among motivational factors. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(8),
1819-1831. This
article reviews a study examining the correlation between compassion
satisfaction, nurse job satisfaction, stress, burnout, and compassion fatigue
in regards to nurse caring. The study is
a correlational design, four tools were used to obtain data and are as follows:
“the Mueller McCloskey Satisfaction Scale (MMSS), the Professional Quality of
Life Scale (ProQOL), Stress in General Scale (SIG) and the Caring Behaviors
Inventory (CBI-24)” (p.1823). Four
hundred and fifty nurses from several different nursing units and two hospital
sites were enlisted in the study. Statistical
data analysis was performed using the SPSS version 15.0.1 software. Four out of five hypotheses were
significantly supported indicating positive correlations between compassion
satisfaction and job satisfaction related to nurse caring. Results indicate negative correlations
between stress and burnout related to nurse caring. Additional demographic analysis suggests less
experienced and less mature nurses may be at a higher risk for compassion
fatigue. This study provides
significance for nursing practice to initiate programs to elevate compassion
satisfaction to improve nurse caring, work environment, and meaning of
life. Günüşen, N., & Ãœstün, B. (2010). An RCT of coping and
support groups to reduce burnout among nurses. International Nursing Review, 57(4), 485-492. This
article discusses a study examining the initiation and assessment of coping and
support groups to decrease the occurrence of burnout among nurses. In Turkey, one hundred and eight nurses
participated in the randomized controlled trials. The nurses were divided into three groups
either support, coping, or control group and received their designated
intervention. The Maslach Burnout
Inventory survey was used to measure burnout levels per and post
intervention. One limitation to the
study is the sample only contained female nurses. The study indicates after all interventions a
reduction in emotional exhaustion scores were displayed, yet no other
dimensions of burnout were altered and no variations were indicated between
alternate interventions. These findings
advocate for the necessity of interventions to reduce burnout in hospitals and
other healthcare organizations. Günüsen, N., & Ãœstün, B. (2009). Turkish nurses’
perspectives on a programme to reduce burnout. International Nursing Review, 56(2), 237-242. This
article examines a qualitative study aimed at assessing viewpoints and
obstacles nurses encounter which are hindering their attendance to a burnout
program. The study interviewed eighteen
nurses who volunteered for the burnout program in a Turkey hospital. Information was collected via face-to-face
interviews within the hospital. The
interviews were transcribed and analyzed.
Three themes were identified among the interviews and are as follows:
“causes of burnout, work-related conditions affecting attendance at burnout
intervention sessions, and person-related conditions affecting attendance at
burnout intervention sessions” (p. 239-240).
The study concludes that work environments, including support from the
organization, influenced the nurses’ ability to attend the burnout
program. Understanding and overcoming
these obstacles can assist in providing support for nurses in combatting the
effects of burnout. Hinderer, K. A., VonRueden, K. T., Friedmann, E.,
McQuillan, K. A., Gilmore, R., Kramer, B., & Murray, M. (2014). Burnout,
Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and Secondary Traumatic Stress in
Trauma Nurses. Journal of Trauma Nursing,
21(4), 160-169. The
articles discusses the condition of burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and
compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction.
The article also examines a cross-sectional descriptive design study of
the relationship amid burnout, compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction,
personal traits, coping skills, and experience to stressful occurrences in
trauma nurses. Several different trauma
unit nurses participated in the study, nurses were sent the surveys with their
paycheck. Information was analyzed using
the SPSS version 15.0 software. The
results revealed nurses with high burnout and compassion fatigue scores
experienced low compassion satisfaction scores.
The study concluded understanding what factors influence these
conditions can leading to preventing these conditions for nurses in the future.
Kaur, D., Sambasivan, M., & Kumar, N. (2013). Effect
of spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and
burnout on caring behavior of nurses: a cross-sectional study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(21/22),
3192-3202. This
article discusses a cross-sectional survey carried out to detect caring
behaviors amid nurses. These behaviors
effect the patients they serve, the organization, and the nurses’ wellbeing. Five hundred and fifty nurses participated in
the survey across seven hospitals in Malaysia.
Additionally, three hundred and forty eight patients were participants
in the study to gather satisfaction scores.
Data was statistically analyzed using computerized software. Results support that nurses with increased
emotional intelligence and psychological ownership have decreased levels of
burnout. This article provides insight
for the necessity of education on spiritual intelligence, emotional
intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout for nurses, in efforts to
improve patient care and nurse wellbeing.
Kim, S. (2013). Compassion fatigue in liver and kidney
transplant nurse coordinators: a descriptive research study. Progress in Transplantation, 23(4),
329-335. This
article examines a descriptive research study to evaluate compassion fatigue
and burnout in transplant nurse coordinators.
Within a convenience sample, fourteen liver and kidney transplant nurse
coordinators completed the surveys utilized in the study. IBM SPSS Software version 19 was utilized to
analyze the study data. The study was
limited due to the small sample size.
The research results suggested over sixty percent of the participants’
experienced average levels of burnout.
Additionally, due to the close patient contact of transplant nurse
coordinators, levels of burnout could affect the patient care provided. The educational level of the transplant nurse
may also impact the level of burnout.
The article provided valuable information regarding burnout for nurse
transplant coordinators. Understanding
the factors causing this condition can provide support and assistance in
preventing nurse burnout. Kowalski, C., Ommen, O., Driller, E., Ernstmann, N.,
Wirtz, M., Köhler, T., & Pfaff, H. (2010). Burnout in nurses — the
relationship between social capital in hospitals and emotional exhaustion. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19(11-12),
1654-1663. This
article discusses a cross-retrospective design study examining the correlation
amid hospital’s social capital, individual decision latitude, amount of work,
and emotional exhaustion in nurses. Nine
hundred and fifty nine nurses across four hospitals participated in the
study.

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Statistical analysis was
performed using the SPSS 15.0 software.
Data indicates an increased amount of work is positively related to
emotional exhaustion, whereas, decision latitude and social capital are
inversely associated to emotional exhaustion. Limitations can be observed while
interpreting information. Based on the
data suggested in the article, providing support to nurses as well as sharing
core values of the hospital may inhibit emotional exhaustion in nurses.Nayeri, N., Negarandeh, R., Vaismoradi, M., Ahmadi, F.,
& Faghihzadeh, S. (2009). Burnout and productivity among Iranian nurses. Nursing & Health Sciences, 11(3),
263-270. This
article examines a descriptive design study aimed at evaluating the association
between productivity and burnout in nurses.
The study surveyed two hundred nurses in Iran. Data was analyzed using the SPSS
software. Results indicate emotional
exhaustion and depersonalization have a significant negative association to
productivity, whereas personal accomplishment had a significantly positive
connection to productivity. The study
was limited by the opinions of productivity from the nurses. This study indicates the need for curricula
or training to eliminate or prevent burnout to improve nurse satisfaction and
patient care.Özden, D., Karagözoğlu, Ş., & Yıldırım, G. (2013).
Intensive care nurses’ perception of futility: Job satisfaction and burnout
dimensions. Nursing Ethics, 20(4),
436-447. This
article discusses a cross-sectional descriptive design study aimed at evaluating
nurse burnout and job satisfaction in relation to nurse perceived futility in
the intensive care unit. The study
comprised of two hundred and six nurses across three hospitals, all nurses were
employed in an intensive care unit.
Three surveys were used to gather the information between January and
February 2012. The study was only
limited to one region therefore the results cannot be comprehensive. The research results indicate nurses who
received ethics education had significantly higher job satisfaction
scores. In contrast, a decrease in job
satisfaction is linked to nurses who experience emotional exhaustion and
depersonalization. This article provides
awareness to factors influencing nurse job satisfaction and burnout for
intensive care nurses, therefore this information may aid in preventing burnout
in the future.Peery, A. (2010). Caring and burnout in registered
nurses: what’s the connection?. International
Journal for Human Caring, 14(2), 53-60. This
article discusses a non-experimental correlational design study aimed at
assessing the relation between burnout and caring in nurses. Eight hundred and eighty nurses were randomly
surveyed utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Caring Behaviors Inventory. Surveys via the mail can be considered a
limitation to this study. Results
indicate a decrease in burnout levels were seen in nurses who felt closer to
their patients. The article suggests a rise in caring precedes to a reduction
in burnout for nurses, therefore understanding factors that can increase caring
may aid in preventing burnout and assist in retaining nurses in the
workforce. Poghosyan, L., Clarke, S., Finlayson, M., & Aiken, L.
(2010). Nurse burnout and quality of care: cross-national investigation in six
countries. Research in Nursing &
Health, 33(4), 288-298. doi:10.1002/nur.20383 This
article is a secondary evaluation of a cross-sectional design study aimed at
determining the association amid nurse burnout and quality of care ratings over
Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

six countries. Over fifty thousand
nurses participated in the study and statistical software was used to analyze
the data. A limitation to the study can
be observed in a varying information collection method from each country as
well as information gathered on quality of patient care. Research results suggest an increase in
emotional exhaustion score may cause a decrease in the quality of care a
patient receives. The information
provided in this article supports the necessity of programs to combat nurse
burnout, in efforts to protect nurse well-being as well as provide high quality
healthcare. Tekindal, B., Tekindal, M. A., Pinar, G., Ozturk, F.,
& Alan, S. (2012). Nurses’ burnout and unmet nursing care needs of
patients’ relatives in a Turkish State Hospital. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 18(1), 68-76.
doi:10.1111/j.1440-172X.2011.01989.x This
article examines a definitive design study intended to evaluate intensive care
nurses’ burnout levels as well as patient care associated to the patients’
family’s needs. The sample consisted of
two hundred and twenty-five nurses and two hundred and twenty-two family
members. Information was gathered using
“the Nurse and Patient Relative Identification Form, the Maslach Burnout
Inventory (MBI) and the Nursing Services Satisfaction Inventory (NSSI)”
(p.69). Statistical software was used to
analyze data. Limitations to this study
were the decreased work experience of the nurse participants. The data related to burnout indicates nurses
with more experience had a decrease in emotional exhaustion levels and a rise
in personal accomplishment levels. Many
factors in the study led nurses to burnout, controlling these factors through
organizational alterations, meetings, education, and support can harvest a
positive change for both the nursing profession and the patients and families
they serve. Traeger, L., Park, E. R., Sporn, N., Repper-DeLisi, J.,
Convery, M. S., Jacobo, M., & Pin, W. F. (2013). Development and Evaluation
of Targeted Psychological Skills Training for Oncology Nurses in Managing
Stressful Patient and Family Encounters.
Oncology Nursing Forum, 40E327-36. doi:10.1188/13.ONF.E327-E336 This
article discusses production and assessment of a psychological skills course
for oncology nurses with the intent to reduce stress and burn out. First a qualitative study was carried out to
gather nurse viewpoints as well as assist with formulating educational needs of
the nurses. The nurse participates have
a minimum of six months experience as an oncology nurse. Following the results from the study,
educational training courses were developed and comprised of seven
modules. An additional study was
conducted to assess the effectiveness of the educational courses. Data was analyzed using statistical
software. The study displayed strengths
while developing the education courses on nurse perceived struggles, although a
limitation is seen in the short assessment time of the course. The data suggest the participants exhibited a
decrease in the feeling of stress and emotional exhaustion when re-evaluated
two months post training. The articles
states the training course was appropriate and provides potential aid for
nurses in decreasing stress and emotional exhaustion, thus feasibly reducing
burnout in the nursing profession. Wang, X., Kunaviktikul, W., & Wichaikhum, O. (2013).
Work empowerment and burnout among registered nurses in two tertiary general
hospitals. Journal of Clinical Nursing,
22(19/20), 2896-2903. doi:10.1111/jocn.12083 This
article discusses a correlational cross-sectional study, this study aimed to
assess the correlation among burnout and work empowerment from the viewpoints
of nurses. Three hundred and eight-five
nurses were randomly surveyed using the Conditions for Work Effectiveness
Questionnaire II and Maslach Burnout Inventory.
Data was analyzed using statistical software. Results indicate a negative relationship was
noted between work empowerment and emotional exhaustion. Inversely, a significantly positive
relationship was noted amid work empowerment and personal accomplishment. The study concluded a correlation between
Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

Assignment:Meanings to Rehabilitation Nurses

work empowerment and nurse burnout was displayed. The article supports advocating for nurses by
providing a positive work environment as well as offering educational training to
aid the nursing profession.ReferencesAssis Tavares, K. F., de Oliveira Souza, N. D., da Silva,
L. D., & Fonseca Kestenberg, C. C. (2014). Prevalence of burnout syndrome
among resident nurses. Acta Paulista De
Enfermagem, 27(3), 260-265. doi:10.1590/1982-0194201400044Burtson, P., & Stichler, J. (2010). Nursing work
environment and nurse caring: relationship among motivational factors. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(8),
1819-1831. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05336.xGünüşen, N., & Ãœstün, B. (2010). An RCT of coping and
support groups to reduce burnout among nurses. International Nursing Review, 57(4), 485-492.
doi:10.1111/j.1466-7657.2010.00808.xGünüsen, N., & Ãœstün, B. (2009). Turkish nurses’
perspectives on a programme to reduce burnout. International Nursing Review, 56(2), 237-242.
doi:10.1111/j.1466-7657.2008.00682.xHinderer, K. A., VonRueden, K. T., Friedmann, E.,
McQuillan, K. A., Gilmore, R., Kramer, B., & Murray, M. (2014). Burnout,
Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, and Secondary Traumatic Stress in
Trauma Nurses. Journal of Trauma Nursing,
21(4), 160-169. doi:10.1097/JTN.0000000000000055Kaur, D., Sambasivan, M., & Kumar, N. (2013). Effect
of spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and
burnout on caring behavior of nurses: a cross-sectional study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(21/22),
3192-3202. doi:10.1111/jocn.12386Kim, S. (2013). Compassion fatigue in liver and kidney
transplant nurse coordinators: a descriptive research study. Progress in Transplantation, 23(4),
329-335. doi:10.7182/pit2013811Kowalski, C., Ommen, O., Driller, E., Ernstmann, N.,
Wirtz, M., Köhler, T., & Pfaff, H. (2010). Burnout in nurses — the
relationship between social capital in hospitals and emotional exhaustion. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19(11-12),
1654-1663. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.02989.xNayeri, N., Negarandeh, R., Vaismoradi, M., Ahmadi, F.,
& Faghihzadeh, S. (2009). Burnout and productivity among Iranian nurses. Nursing & Health Sciences, 11(3),
263-270. doi:10.1111/j.1442-2018.2009.00449.xÖzden, D., Karagözoğlu, Ş., & Yıldırım, G. (2013).
Intensive care nurses’ perception of futility: Job satisfaction and burnout
dimensions. Nursing Ethics, 20(4),
436-447. doi:10.1177/0969733012466002Peery, A. (2010). Caring and burnout in registered nurses:
what’s the connection?. International
Journal for Human Caring, 14(2), 53-60.Poghosyan, L., Clarke, S., Finlayson, M., & Aiken, L.
(2010). Nurse burnout and quality of care: cross-national investigation in six
countries. Research in Nursing &
Health, 33(4), 288-298. doi:10.1002/nur.20383Tekindal, B., Tekindal, M. A., Pinar, G., Ozturk, F.,
& Alan, S. (2012). Nurses’ burnout and unmet nursing care needs of
patients’ relatives in a Turkish State Hospital. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 18(1), 68-76.
doi:10.1111/j.1440-172X.2011.01989.xTraeger, L., Park, E. R., Sporn, N., Repper-DeLisi, J.,
Convery, M. S., Jacobo, M., & Pin, W. F. (2013). Development and Evaluation
of Targeted Psychological Skills Training for Oncology Nurses in Managing Stressful
Patient and Family Encounters. Oncology
Nursing Forum, 40E327-36. doi:10.1188/13.ONF.E327-E336Wang, X., Kunaviktikul, W., & Wichaikhum, O. (2013).
Work empowerment and burnout among registered nurses in two tertiary general
hospitals. Journal of Clinical Nursing,
22(19/20), 2896-2903. doi:10.1111/jocn.12083

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.

Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.

Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.

The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.

 

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CLASS

Discussion Questions (DQ)

Initial responses to the DQ should address all components of the questions asked, include a minimum of one scholarly source, and be at least 250 words.
Successful responses are substantive (i.e., add something new to the discussion, engage others in the discussion, well-developed idea) and include at least one scholarly source.
One or two sentence responses, simple statements of agreement or “good post,” and responses that are off-topic will not count as substantive. Substantive responses should be at least 150 words.
I encourage you to incorporate the readings from the week (as applicable) into your responses.
Weekly Participation

Your initial responses to the mandatory DQ do not count toward participation and are graded separately.
In addition to the DQ responses, you must post at least one reply to peers (or me) on three separate days, for a total of three replies.
Participation posts do not require a scholarly source/citation (unless you cite someone else’s work).
Part of your weekly participation includes viewing the weekly announcement and attesting to watching it in the comments. These announcements are made to ensure you understand everything that is due during the week.
APA Format and Writing Quality

Familiarize yourself with APA format and practice using it correctly. It is used for most writing assignments for your degree. Visit the Writing Center in the Student Success Center, under the Resources tab in LoudCloud for APA paper templates, citation examples, tips, etc. Points will be deducted for poor use of APA format or absence of APA format (if required).
Cite all sources of information! When in doubt, cite the source. Paraphrasing also requires a citation.
I highly recommend using the APA Publication Manual, 6th edition.
Use of Direct Quotes

I discourage overutilization of direct quotes in DQs and assignments at the Masters’ level and deduct points accordingly.
As Masters’ level students, it is important that you be able to critically analyze and interpret information from journal articles and other resources. Simply restating someone else’s words does not demonstrate an understanding of the content or critical analysis of the content.
It is best to paraphrase content and cite your source.
LopesWrite Policy

For assignments that need to be submitted to LopesWrite, please be sure you have received your report and Similarity Index (SI) percentage BEFORE you do a “final submit” to me.
Once you have received your report, please review it. This report will show you grammatical, punctuation, and spelling errors that can easily be fixed. Take the extra few minutes to review instead of getting counted off for these mistakes.
Review your similarities. Did you forget to cite something? Did you not paraphrase well enough? Is your paper made up of someone else’s thoughts more than your own?
Visit the Writing Center in the Student Success Center, under the Resources tab in LoudCloud for tips on improving your paper and SI score.
Late Policy

The university’s policy on late assignments is 10% penalty PER DAY LATE. This also applies to late DQ replies.
Please communicate with me if you anticipate having to submit an assignment late. I am happy to be flexible, with advance notice. We may be able to work out an extension based on extenuating circumstances.
If you do not communicate with me before submitting an assignment late, the GCU late policy will be in effect.
I do not accept assignments that are two or more weeks late unless we have worked out an extension.
As per policy, no assignments are accepted after the last day of class. Any assignment submitted after midnight on the last day of class will not be accepted for grading.
Communication

Communication is so very important. There are multiple ways to communicate with me:
Questions to Instructor Forum: This is a great place to ask course content or assignment questions. If you have a question, there is a good chance one of your peers does as well. This is a public forum for the class.
Individual Forum: This is a private forum to ask me questions or send me messages. This will be checked at least once every 24 hours.