Assessment of the Child: Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet Paper

NRS 434 Assessment of the Child: Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet Paper Details:

NRS 434 Assessment of the Child Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet Paper

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The physical examination of a school-aged child always follows the same pattern: general appearance assessment, vital signs, anthropometric measurement, pain assessment, and head-to-toe inspection. During the initial meeting, the nurse conducts a general survey with the school-age child to get a first impression. The general survey gathers data on a child’s age, gender, and race, as well as health and behavior recommendations (Srinath et al., 2019). All children’s vital signs, including body temperature, pulse, respiration, and blood pressure, are taken. The typical ranges, however, differ depending on the child’s age. Anthropometric measurements such as height and weight are compared to the WHO growth chart to track a child’s growth (Srinath et al., 2019). The cognitive ability of the child determines how pain is assessed.

The four main methods of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation, are used in the physical evaluation of school-aged children. The evaluation is performed from head to toe, with the area of the body causing the most discomfort evaluated last (Srinath et al., 2019). Children in this age group are subjected to additional screenings such as eye tests and dental screens because they are at a higher risk of dental cavities and vision impairments.

The physical would take place in a quiet, private setting, with age and developmental stage appropriate assessment procedures. A simple drape or a colorful examination robe may be worn over the underpants because children of this age prefer it. Furthermore, difficult or unpleasant operations would be performed last to ensure the child’s comfort during the evaluation (Choo et al., 2019). Having the opportunity to teach the school-age child about the body and personal hygiene during the medical examination would be extremely beneficial.

In this assignment, you will be exploring actual and potential health problems in the childhood years using a functional health assessment and Erickson’s Stages of Child Development. To complete this assignment, do the following:

1. Using the textbook, complete the “Children’s Functional Health Pattern Assessment.” Follow the instructions in the resource for completing the assignment.

2. Cite and reference any outside sources used in your answers. Include in your assessment a thorough discussion of Erickson’s Stages of Child Development as it pertains to the development age of the child.

Assessment of the Child: Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet Paper

NRS 434 Assessment of the Child Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet Paper
NRS 434 Assessment of the Child Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet Paper

 

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Developmental Assessment and the School-Aged Child

Child development is the constant but predictably chronological biological, psychological, and emotional changes that occur in humans between birth and adolescence. The order of development is the same for all children and is defined in developmental milestones (Choo et al., 2019). This stage is characterized by gradual growth and development. This paper will discuss the physical assessments among school-aged children, outline the typical developmental stages of a 10-year-old, and apply the Erickson theory in assessing a child.

Typical Developmental Stages of Children at 10 Years

A 10-year-old child’s physical development milestones include: using both hands independently, throwing balls skillfully, participating in organized sports, and handling eating utensils skillfully (Choo et al., 2019). A child of ten years old enjoys all physical activities and is still working on his motor coordination. A 10-year-cognitive-developmental old’s stages include higher mental ability functioning (Choo et al., 2019). Cognitive milestones include improved concentration and the ability to initiate quiet activities that challenge cognitive skills, such as computer and board games and reading. Expected emotional findings include short bursts of anger, fears of bodily injury, and fear of the dark (Maguire et al., 2016). Becoming more peer-oriented, improving relationships with siblings, and having more self-control, confidence, and sincerity are all social developmental milestones (Maguire et al., 2016). Furthermore, children at this age show increasing independence in decision-making as well as an increasing need for independence from family. A 10-year-old respects his or her parents and their roles, participates in formal and informal groups, and works on real-world tasks.

Using Erickson Theory to Assess Development

According to Erickson’s developmental theory, children of school age fall into the industry versus inferiority stage. According to the theory, school-age children are interested in learning how to do things correctly (Orenstein & Lewis, 2020). Their sense of industry develops when a child is encouraged to do, make, or create practical things and is commended and rewarded for their accomplishment when given the opportunity to complete the projects (Orenstein & Lewis, 2020). When their efforts are mocked or deemed a shambles, they develop a sense of inferiority. I would use the Erickson theory to assess a child’s development by assigning the child a task, such as stacking cubes. I would then assess their level of interest in performing the task correctly, as well as their emotions when performing it correctly. In addition, I would ask the caregiver about the child’s emotional reaction when he fails to complete a task correctly.

To gain the child’s cooperation during the physical examination, I would answer his or her questions openly and simply. To reduce anxiety in the younger child, I would involve the caregiver as much as possible. Furthermore, to increase the chances of examining a cooperative child, I would allow the child to handle safe, clean examination equipment such as the stethoscope.

Conclusion

Physical assessments among school-aged children are similar in the approach and techniques use. It entails a general survey, obtaining vital signs and anthropometric measurements, head-to-toe exam, dental screening, and vision test.  The assessment should be performed in a quiet and private environment, and the painful procedures should come last.  Developmental milestones of a 10-year-old include physical, cognitive, emotional, and social aspects. The Erickson theory can be applied in assessing a school-age child by examining the child’s emotional reaction when they succeed or fail a task.

Assessment of the Child: Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet

Assessment of the Child: Functional Health Pattern Analysis Worksheet 1

Children’s Functional Health Pattern Assessment

Functional Health Pattern Assessment (FHP) Toddler

Erickson’s Developmental Stage:

Preschool-Aged

Erickson’s Developmental Stage:

School-Aged

Erickson’s Developmental Stage:

Pattern of Health Perception and Health Management:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Nutritional-Metabolic Pattern:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Pattern of Elimination:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Pattern of Activity and Exercise:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Cognitive/Perceptual Pattern:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Pattern of Sleep and Rest:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Pattern of Self-Perception and Self-Concept:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Role-Relationship Pattern:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List 2 potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Sexuality – Reproductive Pattern:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Pattern of Coping and Stress Tolerance:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List wo potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Pattern of Value and Beliefs:

List two normal assessment findings that would be characteristic for each age group.

List two potential problems that a nurse may discover in an assessment of each age group.

Short Answer Questions

Address the following based on the above assessment findings. Expected answers will be 1-2 paragraphs in length. Cite and reference outside sources used.

  1. Compare and contrast identified similarities as well as differences in expected assessment across the childhood age groups.
  1. Summarize how a nurse would handle physical assessments, examinations, education, and communication differently with children versus adults. Consider spirituality and cultural differences in your answer.

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